Burning Uncle Tom’s Cabin

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Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin was one of the most influential novels of its time. However, reading the classic today brings to light stereotypes and plot issues. But rather than write off this classic, author Carl Waters re-imagines and remixes the story into a four-book series that builds from the world and characters Stowe created and expands on the good she intended.

In Burning Uncle Tom’s Cabin, young slave George Harris is a self-taught inventor whose owner despises him. His wife Eliza, however, belongs to another slave owner, along with their three-year-old son Harry.

While George dreams of the day when he can escape to Canada and work to earn enough money so he can buy his family’s freedom, Eliza tries to see the best in her situation. But when her owner falls into financial troubles and plans to offer up Harry as payment against his debt, Eliza runs north with her son.

Suddenly, George must forget his careful planning and immediately go after his family if he has any hope of finding them before the slave hunters capture them. Can the runaway slave, George, find his family and save them? Can he navigate the Underground Railroad and get to Canada? Can he finally gain his freedom?

An innovative retelling that offers fresh insight into America’s past, Burning Uncle Tom’s Cabin is sure to spark as much conversation as the original classic itself. Stowe created the first slavery fiction world and Waters plans to make that world bigger. Most slavery books aim to teach the reader about the dark days of American slavery. Instead, the Burning Uncle Tom’s Cabin series will show the reader what could have happened.

The Author

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Carl Waters, born and raised in Miami, Florida, grew up reading comic books and dreamed of being a new kind of superhero. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami and moved to Atlanta, Georgia, where he now lives with his wife and daughter.
Waters never forgot his childhood dreams, which over the years transformed into a desire to create new heroes, particularly African-American male heroes, through writing. His debut offering is Burning Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the first book in a four-part series that re-imagines Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic novel, featuring strong characters who break out of the old stereotypes.

http://www.amazon.com/Carl-Waters/e/B00L05RJ76/

Ten Tips To Help Your Child Learn To Love Reading

Article originally posted by Ellen Buikema (Practical strategies for life)

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  1. Sing, play, and talk with your child. Children love to hear your voice. It doesn’t matter if you sing on or off key. Interaction is what children crave.
  2. Read aloud to your child every day. Reading to your child is the next best thing to a hug. Bring books along to the dentist, doctor, or on other errands where there will be some wait time. Read to children as part of a bedtime ritual. Routines are reassuring.
  3. Have a variety of reading material that is easily available. Place books in baskets in different parts of the home, including in the bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and TV areas. This allows children to choose books on their own and makes cleaning up after themselves easy. Consider putting together a backpack prefilled with books to grab and go for short or long distance travel.
  4. Read many types of books. Children love learning about their world, how things work, and all kinds of animals. Reading for information is important for childrens’ future. They love books with rhyme, silly words, and fairy tales. Start bringing your children to the library when they are young, and visit regularly.
  5. Pace the reading. Read with expression! Change the quality and volume of sound while reading to make listening to stories fun. Take your time, don’t rush. Stop now and then during reading time to let your child think about the story. Ask questions to encourage thinking.
  6. Repeat. Children enjoy reading favorite stories over and over again, even after they are able to repeat all the words by heart. Encourage them to read their favorite lines with you. Point to the words as you read them together. Talk about your child’s favorite characters in different contexts, like “What do you think The Cat in the Hat would do if he was in our kitchen right now?”
  7. Find words and letters everywhere. As early as age two, children may identify logos they see often at home and other places they travel. This important milestone is the beginning of the knowledge that print has meaning. Cereal boxes are great to use for finding letters and logos, as are menus, calendars and occupant mail. Take turns finding the same letter with your child. Write to do and grocery lists together. Have him make words with magnetic letters on the refrigerator.
  8. Help your child learn about letter sounds. Show her how to write her name. A child’s name is her first “stamp” on the world. Say the sounds of each letter as you print them. Sing an alphabet song and include the sounds of the letter in the song, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELlZKpi1Zs . Encourage your child to write but try not to correct him. Beginning writing should be playful.
  9. Limit tube time. Select TV programs with your child in advance. Watch TV and talk about the programs together. Monitor time on other electronic devices. Video games are good fun and many of them are educational, but balance is needed. Too much close work does not give the eyes enough exercise.
  10. Get involved with your child’s school. You are your child’s first and best advocate. Get to know your child’s teacher. Find out how you can support your child in her academic goals. If at all possible, volunteer time in the classroom. Work schedules make this difficult, but advance planning can help make this happen.

    You are your children’s first teacher. Reading to them is a great start in preparation for life in school and beyond.

    To find out more over this website: http://ellenbuikema.com/ten-tips-to-help-your-child-learn-to-love-reading/

The Night Of The Mosquito

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August 10, 2014, England. An apocalyptic event strikes without warning, wiping out power and communications throughout the country. Amid the ensuing chaos, a six-foot-ten-inch tall killer who claims links to Jack the Ripper escapes custody. Seemingly unstoppable, he leaves a trail of death and destruction in his wake.

In the village of Churchend, retired hypnotherapist Michael Anderson suffers an extreme reaction to a mosquito bite. The resulting delirium and soul searching convince him his life is about to change – but first, he must fight to stay alive. A rich and varied cast of characters is portrayed in this gripping thriller.

Filled with action, suspense and moving drama, you’ll root for the heroes in this roller-coaster ride of a story. ‘China’s writing is great; he excels at bone-crunching action scenes.’ Amazon USA review.

The Author

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Max China

It is said that everyone has a book inside them, and I’ve wanted to write mine since I was seventeen. It took a long time to get around to it, but now I’m finding it hard to stop.

My debut novel, The Sister, hit the UK Kindle top 100 chart soon after release in late January 2014, peaking at no 81, something I’d have never thought possible, except in my dreams. It’s still selling.
The book led to a listing in the Top 50 Crime Writers to Watch in 2014 and also received a Gold Medal award from HarperCollins site Authonomy, earlier this year.

The second book, The Life and Times of William Boule, is an action, adventure, crime thriller, and follows the lives of several characters introduced in The Sister. The story is complete in its own right – you don’t have to have read the earlier book to enjoy it. Released late summer 2014, it’s been well received, gaining some excellent reviews.

My third novel, The Night of The Mosquito, will be released 29 September 2015. It’s an interesting blend of crime, mystery and psychological thriller. Set against an apocalyptic backdrop, it’s a roller-coaster ride of a story!

Currently, I’m working on a fourth novel, an expansion of the short story, Don’t Turn on The Light.

Other work in the pipeline, includes another three Miller stories, The Man in Brown, Finding Her, and The Resurrectionists.

I can’t write quickly enough, but at the same time, I recognize the need to develop great characters, produce good, solid story lines, and quality writing. I hope those of you who’ve enjoyed my books so far will continue to do so.

Finders Keepers:Simple Book About Complicated Ideas

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Book review by Bethanne Patrick, a freelance writer.

As his dedicated readers know, multiple versions of Stephen King, Author, exist. There is the King of classic horror, like Cujo, Children of the Corn, and Christine. There is the King of feminist uprising, from Carrie toDolores Claiborne to Bag of Bones. There is the King of strong series work, like The Dark Tower and The Green Mile.

I could go on, but the King we meet in the new Finders Keepers (the second of what seems to be a trilogy starting with last year’s Mr. Mercedes) is yet another man: The King of chilling writer tales like Misery, a man who’s long explored the relationship between writing and madness, reading and obsession, artist and audience. In fact, one the things King chews over in this new book is the question of how many versions of an author do exist, and how those versions affect different people.

Finders Keepers picks up years after Mr. Mercedes left off: Famous novelist John Rothstein died back in the first book, and now we’re following zealous Rothstein fan Morris Bellamy, and a boy named Pete Saubers. (You may find plenty of spoilers in other reviews, but not here. It isn’t necessary to know all of the details in order to understand this new book, although they’re given early on in Finders Keepers. If you want to be surprised, pick upMr. Mercedes first.)

Due to an unexpected find, Saubers has become quite an expert on the late, reclusive Rothstein, whose creation and legacy must have been delicious fun for King to develop; he’s a mid-20th-century literary lion in the vein of J.D. Salinger and John Updike. Rothstein’s oeuvre even has Updike-esque titles: The Runner, The Runner Sees Action, and The Runner Slows Down.

When villainy threatens the Saubers family, they fortunately hit the radar of an eccentric trio (also from the first book): Ex-cop Bill Hodges, tech expert Jerome Robinson, and researcher Holly Gibney. At first, following three storylines—Bellamy’s, Pete’s, and the trio’s—feels a little elementary, the reading equivalent of training wheels, even though the writing is as sound as ever.

Then you remember that almost everyone needs training wheels before they take off on just two. King picks up the pace almost instantaneously, and vroooooooom, there goes the action! Vroom, too, goes the consideration of what is means to be a close reader. What matters more—knowing every detail, or understanding the big picture? Can you ever hold a writer responsible for his work, or does a reader’s interpretation change things?

Most important, perhaps, is the question of how we read other people. Most of the characters in this novel have their vision clouded one way or another, a mistake that can be costly. Stephen King sometimes writes complicated books about simple things (cars, baseball); here he writes a simple book about complicated ideas. And if, at first, you think Finders Keepers is meat-and-potatoes King, just wait: The dessert is really satisfying.

The Author

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Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Doctor Sleep and Under the Dome, now a major TV miniseries on CBS. His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller as well as the Best Hardcover Book Award from the International Thriller Writers Association. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

http://www.amazon.com/Stephen-King/e/B000AQ0842/