The Men Called Intrepid: Johan Van Dongen And Joel Savage

HIV 7A new aggressive strain of the HIV virus has been discovered in West Africa, and researchers say the recombinant virus can progress from infection to illness (AIDS) in just about five years.

BIOGRAPHY OF MICROSURGEON JOHAN VAN DONGEN

If the achievement of man is measured by truth, Johan Van Dongen would have been one of the most famous scientists or microsurgeons in the world, but because we live in a society whereby politicians drink and eat with a brood of vipers, Dongen is now an enemy.

Professor Johan Van Dongen is a Dutch microsurgeon, who found out after forty years of research that Aids and Ebola were man-made diseases or laboratory engineered as bio-weapons and tested on Africans to depopulate the continent.

This is a secret to the common man on the street but top scientists, World Health Organization, Center for Diseases Control, world leaders, politicians and countries like America, Germany, Holland, Belgium, France etc, that played a role in those medical crimes knew about it.

The Dutch Government wasn’t expecting Dongen to publish his findings as books because, for decades, it has been the task of world leaders to cover up those heinous medical crimes. Then aftermath of revealing the truth about the diseases, Dongen was dismissed as a lecturer at the University of Maastricht, Holland.

THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF JOHAN VAN DONGEN

johan-10Microsurgeon and scientist Johan Van Dongen 

Johan van Dongen was born on May 15, 1946, to a very poor family in the southern part of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, during one of the coldest days in that time of the year. His father was a salesman who deals in second-hand clothes.

After the destruction of Rotterdam during the Second World War, his father returned home from Germany after nine months. Like many sons, Johan didn’t agree with his father, because he often abused and hit his mother and all his children. Eventually, he became an alcoholic after the war.

At the age of four, Johan who couldn’t cope with the regime and domination faced many obstacles at school. Within no time after several severe incidents, the authorities threw him out of school with the message: “We will see him back at the age of six.”

At secondary school, Johan enjoyed his education due to a good female teacher teaching him. The problems started in the third grade with a new teacher. This teacher couldn’t cope with Johan’s intelligence and probing manners. Within some few months, he was dismissed from school for the second time. Yet still, he managed to pass all his exams to the next grades.

Due to the poorness of Johan’s family, the Protestant Pastor paid his family a visit and told his parents that the family had to baptize him to get rid of the poverty. So at the age of seven Johan was baptized likeJohn the Baptist baptizing Jesus, with the holy words from the pastor: “Johan is a boy with a message and vision but the only thing in his mind is food.”

Johan managed to stay at work for six months in a row, and during the strongest winter ever since, he started a new job as a bicycle boy and worked for two years in poultry shop. In 1963 – he started another work in butchery shop at the Northern Island of Rotterdam and after three years, he received his butcher’s certificate.

1964 – Skilled and experienced Johan was appointed as a chief in charge of a poultry annex butchery shop for four years at the age of seventeen. The skills at the latter place impressed his boss, who advised him to become a surgeon. At the peak of his career, something terrible happened to Johan. His father disappeared without showing up again.

Because of that event, Johan as the elder son became head of the family, taking care of
six younger brothers and a twenty-year-old physically disabled brother. Under this heavy load, Johan worked as a butcher at the poultry.

In 1969 – At the age of twenty-three Johan was appointed as a laboratory animal keeper at the Department of General Surgery in the basements of the Dijkzigt Hospital in Rotterdam, part of the Erasmus University. Because of his experience with dead animals and as a butcher he knew a lot about the anatomy of animals.

1969 – 1976 – During a period of six years Johan studied the professions of: Laboratory Animal Keeper and Animal Technology at the University of Leiden The Netherlands and graduated in 1973. From May 1972 till 1976 – Johan studied Experimental Microsurgery at the Erasmus University Rotterdam the Netherlands and graduated in May 1976.

In 1972, during a weekly laboratory meeting, Johan van Dongen heard one of his professors’ saying: “Cytomegalovirus CMV.  That dangerous virus could be a cross between flu and a herpes virus, built into a bacterium and then it looks like protozoa.”

The words of Professor Dr. D.L. Westbroek, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, never left Johan, because, during his forty-two years of investigation into the origin of Ebola and AIDS-causing viruses, he met the same conclusion. Johan discovered that those microorganisms were tested predominantly on black people in concentration camps and Africa.
In a monomaniac circumstance, Johan investigated the role of the medical, pharmacological and military presence of foreign countries in Africa and what they were doing in their bio-warfare plants in the African Jungle and why several outbreaks of horrific diseases took place.

Johan’s knowledge about medical crimes in Africa was a turning point in his career. He started to fight and went to court six times which lasted for five years. After his dismissal, according to the judge because of inconsistent mood, Johan decided to give his life for the cause of Africa. He  didn’t only lost his job and house but also all his money for paying his lawsuits which brought him into relative poverty.

“I am satisfied that I fought a good battle, a battle of truth. My conscience is clear and never regrets of what I went through. I feel very sorry for those who committed the crimes, covered it up and subjected me to such an ordeal. If there is God, then may God have mercy upon their souls.”

BIOGRAPHY OF WRITER AND JOURNALIST JOEL SAVAGE

Joel Savage is an African-Belgian journalist living and working in Antwerp since the year 2000. He was the first African journalist to enter into the notorious Stuivenberg Hospital in Antwerp to investigate the high abnormal death of Africans at the hospital.

It was a period Africans living in Antwerp were scared to visit the hospital because patients with a common leg injury, don’t come back alive after consultation. There was something sinister going on of which the African community believe that Africans were deliberately killed to satisfy the demand of people in the queue for an organ transplant.

What alerted Joel’s consciousness to accept the challenge of doing the investigation is, he witnessed a demonstration of Albanians on the same issue because an Albanian mysteriously lost his life at the same hospital.

The other fact is historical. King Leopold II of Belgium maimed and killed over 10 million Africans, including women and children, yet Belgium named streets after him, above all built his statue as an honor. Which person in his right mind will do such a thing when there is no statue of Adolf Hitler for killing six million Jews?

The whole world witnessed the brutal murder of Patrice Lumumba in Congo, by Belgium, the fact that they lost the country as a colony through independence. Don’t forget about the Rwanda genocide which Belgium was responsible. (You can read about this in the book called ‘The Shadow Of The Sun’ by Polish writer and journalist Ryzard Kapucinski.) With such evidence revealing that Belgium doesn’t value the life of an African, I believed the story of the Africans. Indeed, the hospital is deliberately killing Africans for body organs.

After my investigation, I published the book in Africa as ‘An African in Antwerp’ and some years later, I updated it and published it in America as ‘Little Boygium-Wonderful Experience.’ One of the directors of The City of Antwerp, called Els Bruyndonc was furious over the publication calling it stupid.

According to her, the husband is a journalist and wouldn’t publish such a stupid thing. I replied: Your husband is a journalist but not an African. Crimes committed against Africans in Antwerp are never seen in any Belgium newspapers.

Aftermath the publication, fear gripped Antwerp. They thought the African community would attack the hospital, so they quickly sent police to protect the place. They were there for over two weeks. During their presence, I disguised myself and visited the hospital thrice, to see if I can get ample information from the conversation of the workers and the police, the place was quiet.

The shocking part of the story is, even though they called my publication stupid, the high death rate suddenly fell, making Stuivenberg one of the safest hospitals for foreigners. However, there are few Africans today, as soon as you mention the hospital’s name, cold waves run through their spine. They keep away from Stuivenberg Hospital.

THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF JOEL SAVAGE

hovah 4Joel Savage: Writer

Joel Savage was born in Cape Coast, the central region of Ghana, on January 19, 1957, to Justin Savage, a veteran journalist, and television producer, and Nancy Hudson (Savage) a professional seamstress. He had his secondary school education at Ebenezer Secondary School and Accra High School. In 1985, while working in Freetown, Sierra Leone, he became a naturalized citizen, therefore losing his nationality as a Ghanaian.

His father’s influence propelled his flair for writing at a very tender age. At school, he wrote numerous articles for publication. After school, he followed a course at the Ghana Institute of Journalism to acquire more experience and writing skills. As a freelance writer, he wrote feature articles for the Daily Graphic, Ghanaian Times and The Weekly Spectator for a certain period.

He became a naturalized Belgian citizen in 2008. He is now a prolific writer and accredited press card holding member of the Vlaamse Journalisten Vereniging-Flemish Journalists Association. With his wife and three sons living in Antwerp, Joel writes regularly online. He has published seven books and working on new projects.

Joel teamed up with his best friend Johan Van Dongen to write the English version of ‘Aids and Ebola, the greatest crime in medical history against mankind.’

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J.N.K. Savage:Tracing The Works Of A Great Journalist Behind Computer Age

SAV 6Journalist/Documentary film Producer and Director Justin N.K. Savage and wife Nancy-Elizabeth Savage (Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson) You looking at my mother and father.

Justin Nobleman Kodwo Savage was a professional journalist, documentary film producer and director, born at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana in 1932. While in active service, he passed away on January 29, 1976.

At Guinea Press, now ‘The Ghanaian Times’ during the Kwame Nkrumah era, Mr. Savage travelled extensively across the globe, whenever the president leaves the country to participate in world affairs.

At home, Ghanaians were able to receive first-hand information from Mr. Savage, over Nkrumah’s trip overseas, appearing in ‘The Evening News,’ newspaper dominated by party news, CPP, and adulation of Nkrumah.

At Guinea Press, Justin Savage had the opportunity to make further studies in journalism in London, England, but Nkrumah’s interest in communism took him off Ghana soil to many Eastern European countries including Poland, Czechoslovakia etc, and Russia.

In the sixties, the president of the then Czechoslovakia invited African journalists to his country. Justin Savage heads the African journalists from Ghana, but the Ghanaians presence stole the show, because of the native Kente cloth they put on. Kente exposes the rich tradition and culture of Ghana.

Justin Savage filed his press cuts and combined all his publications which appeared in the newspapers as a magazine, naming it “A Mixture Of Periodicals.” These publications later after his death, became my favourite book, assisting me to gain more writing skills when my interest increased to be a writer.

Darkness fell on Ghana when Nkrumah was overthrown-ed on February 24, 1966, in a coup organized by CIA and local collaborators. Chaos and curfews followed amidst jubilation and sadness. Mr. Savage served Guinea press a year more and he resigned.

He followed a course in technology at the Kumasi Science and Technology, where he studied film production. After his course, he entered into Ghana Broadcasting Corporation as ‘Advisor on film for television.’

He excelled in his profession and had promotions. It wasn’t long when Friedrich Ebert Foundation (West German Television Team) established a television project attached to the Broadcasting House in Ghana.

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung is a German political foundation named after Friedrich Ebert, Germany’s first democratically elected president. Headquartered in Bonn and Berlin, the foundation contributes to social democracy by means of:

Political education in order to reinforce its fundamental values, research and scientific analysis of central policy areas, various forms of public dialogue in order to pave the way for it, scholarship programs for students and Ph.D. candidates, development cooperation aimed at global justice and building bridges of international cooperation for worldwide democracy.

For efficient service and to be familiar with new developments in television production, Mr. Savage was at West German for an intensive course. He returned to the Broadcasting House and was appointed ‘Documentary Film Producer and Director.

At the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, he made a number of documentary films, especially during the exhibition of Ghana and other African products at both the first and second ‘Ghana International Trade Fair,’ in Accra.

Kodwo, the name his co-workers loved to call him, did a number of documentary films, including ‘Ghana At A Glance, Cocoa In Ghana, Backyard Industries and ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced in 1972. I had the opportunity to play a role in ‘Backyard Industries.’

I grew up to see some of his friends such as Mr. Kofi Badu, the Managing Director of Daily Graphic and Mr. Willie Donkor, the Editor of Weekly Spectator, still in the media. In the early nineties, January, I contacted one of my father’s friends called Mr. Ebo Biney, at the Broadcasting House, requesting if he could telecast one of my father’s film on January 29, for remembrance. It came as a shock to me when I learned that all my father’s films got burnt, following a fire which engulfed Ghana Broadcasting Corporation some time ago.

Since then I have been working very hard to see if I can find any of my father’s work online, despite far behind computer age or advanced modern technology. Like winning a lotto, I discovered two. The first is at the website of Len Pole, a Museum Consultant: “Advisor on a film for television, ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced by Kodwo Savage, Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.” – http://www.lenpole.com/I contacted the museum consultant after the discovery of my father’s work on his website. I was delighted when he told a few years ago ‘Furnace in a village’ was shown at Cannes Film Festival.

Then I had a new break through  when I discovered another work at: Selected Bibliography in Communication – jstor by Graham B. Kerr, under the topic- All African governments are committed to development and most wish to …Journalism Quarterly [forthcoming]. ….. SAVAGEJ.N.K. “Ghana Jugend begeistert.- . “Ghana inspires youth.”

The selected Bibliography in Communication is a book published by the Canadian Association of African Studies. Justin Savage writes:

“We must bridge the gap between leaders and masses, between government and people . . No government tells the people everything, but every government must reach the people so as to tell them what they should be told” – Julius Nyerere

Continue reading: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/483601.pdf?

The search for my father’s work isn’t yet over. As time goes on when I discover something new, I will keep on updating this article. I hope readers will enjoy reading it and if any reader has any suggestion to improve it, you are always welcome.

The incredible story of this great writer neglected when he was a child is now available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Writer-Died-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L54A7O

My Name Is Savage, But I am Not Savage

Big Joe 5“Whatever happens to me benefits me.” – Joel Savage

Why many do ask me if ‘Savage’ is my real name? Once a British woman told me she hates her name ‘Mrs Ball’ and worst of all, my father’s name is ‘Mr. Underworld,’  she said. Yes, many of us have strange names. Some do change and others keep them.

I was born Joel Savage, at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana, on January 19, 1957, to Justin Savage, a professional journalist and Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson, an accomplished seamstress and a sewing teacher.

Last year, during my summer holidays in Barcelona, Spain, I gave one of my books to a student I met at the hotel I lodged. At the computer hall, I was flabbergasted when I saw his friends laughing at my name. I pretended I wasn’t listening to their conversation.

Then on January 1, 2016, history repeats itself. At the Kotoka International Airport in Accra, Ghana, when ready to board my flight, an officer at the last checkpoint controlled my passport and the only question he threw at me is: How do you pronounce this word? Pointing directly to the name, “Savage,” I answered.

“Well, I’m glad that you mentioned it yourself, because I thought that may provoke you if I had said the same thing.” He said and gave back my passport to me.

If names have impact on people, then I am exceptional. I am happily married since 1993 and still live with the same woman. If I’m savage, uncivilized, cruel or a beast, my wife wouldn’t have been with me today. My three sons can stand behind me and tell everyone how caring and compassionate their father is.

What I know about myself is, I have intrepid sort of character. I don’t give up and no one can break me down physically, psychologically, emotionally or spiritually. In my life, I take any misfortune as beneficial and every problem as a challenge, because you can’t survive in this world if you submit to problems.

This is the reason many people are depressed, alcoholics or drug addicts. Because they don’t have the will power to fight and overcome those destructive tendencies. Savage is just a name but it has no influence on me. I believe in God and the Bible is my shield and Armour.

Journalist Frankie Asare-Donkoh’s Wisdom Of The Ancient

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In the early nineties, when writing as a freelance journalist to some newspapers, including ‘Daily Graphic’ in Accra, certain journalists helped me to develop and acquired the skills in writing. Apart George Sydney Abugri and K.B. Asante, Frankie Asare-Donkoh played a significant role in my life as an aspiring writer.

I read many of the afore-mentioned writers’ articles and used their expertise to boost my style of writing, which turned out to be very good for me. Daily Graphic never rejects any article I submit. Sometimes, ‘Ghanaian Times’ will use the same article and change the title.

What makes Frankie’s articles more interesting is the way he articulates and combines his humorous writings. In my recent visit to Cape Coast, I posted a picture on Facebook and immediately heard Frankie’s voice. His comments reminded me of the good old days in Ghana, when contributing regularly to the features, while he writes a column ‘Frankly Speaking’ in Daily Graphic.

Frankie said “Dasssright – see the real Fantes (Ghanaians from Central and Western regions of Ghana) and their usual ‘abrofodzin. (White matters)  In my days at Graphic we usually teased our senior colleague Llyod Evans as being part of the remnants of European Imperialists immorality, and he would usually stop whatever he was doing and chase whoever said it. And here Uncle Savage, Uncle Smith, and Uncle Ephraim bring me those newsroom memories.”

“But one thing is certain: the coastal Fantes no doubt still lead the country when it comes to real ‘brofo’ (English) and it’s not surprisingly Uncle Savage from his Belgium base continuously and savagely takes on the Europeans any time they try to humiliate Africans. Kudos, my brother, you didn’t only inherit the European name, but also the language with which you tell them what others are not able to.”

While in Britain, Mr. Asare-Donkoh also worked on one of my books. I give my thanks to him and all the journalists that partially and wholly helped to shape my career as a writer. I have really enjoyed my profession without regrets.

Frankie Asare-Donkoh’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/fasado

Read ‘The Daily Graphic online.’: http://graphic.com.gh/

Tourism: Step Into The Paradise Taste Of Tropical Fruits In Ghana

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Home sweet home: Joel Savage enjoys the sweet juicy water of fresh coconut.

The axiom, “All work and no play, makes Jack a dull boy” might have originally been conceived by a domestic idealist, who knows the truth. Working hard without a break can affect your health. The impact can take its toll on you.

This is the reason I decided to visit my mother at the age of 80, in Ghana, after five years. Seeing her grey hair, but strong and healthy, boosted my happiness. In my daily prayers I always ask God to give her long life, to enjoy her fruits of labour, and it seems He has answered my prayers.

My mother after losing her husband at the age of 44, in 1976, (The Writer Died) https://goo.gl/hLBqj4, left with eight children, without any support, took the responsibility alone to make sure that we were fed, clothed, accommodated and educated.

In Ghana, I visited many places including the Cape Coast castle, in the central region of Ghana and some villages, such as ‘Akatechiwa’ which has intriguing story leading to the village’s name. I will be sharing all the interesting articles pertaining my visit with you very soon on social media.

Apart from my adventure and exploration, I enjoyed the fresh tropical fruits, such as coconut, mango, sweet apple etc. Many in foreign countries, such as Europeans and Americans may have the experience of tasting juicy canned tropical fruits, but nothing compares to the original fresh taste of tropical fruits taken moments from the trees in Ghana or Africa generally.

Many Europeans and Americans yearly make a trip to Ghana to explore its ancient castles and forts and some have settled finally in the country, saying good bye to Europe and America. Don’t let the foreign media deceive you. Be part of those visiting Ghana.

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The Coconut tree: I know that there are thousands of readers interested in non-fiction genre of books, thus; one of my goals is to share my non-fiction books through diversity of culture. My utterly and compelling collections are destined to capture the reader’s attention and interest, to learn about other people’s culture and heritage.

My books are in the categories of travel, immigration, health and entertainment. The personal account of the stories reflect on the places I visited in Africa, such as Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Togo, Benin and Gambia. And in Europe, it’s about life in Barcelona, Spain, Aahus, Denmark, England, Amsterdam, Holland, Rome, Italy and Antwerp, Belgium.

The African stories act like a guide to European and Americans tourists. The books will teach you how to avoid being a victim to thieves, armed robbers and immigration crooks, that prey on nationals and foreigners, while the Europeans stories teach Africans how to survive in Europe, without papers and crime.

Great African-Americans Who Were Once In Ghana

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Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay’s) visit to Ghana in 1964: In photo with Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, first president of Ghana. 

Among all the West African countries, Ghana, the country formally called Gold Coast, is one of the famous countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Apart from being one of the peaceful countries in West Africa, Ghana has been one of the most visited countries in Africa by Africans in the Diaspora.

There is a reason Ghana is attracted to Africans in the Diaspora. Echoes of sad music in the air can be heard from Cape Coast, attracting thousands of tourists including African-Americans and other Africans in the Diaspora to visit Ghana, where their ancestors were packed like sardine into ships for slavery.

Apart from the fact that many Africans in the Diaspora go to Ghana to trace their roots or find their ancestors, Ghana was once under one of Africa’s most powerful and intelligent leaders, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah. He was the first African statesman to achieve world recognition when he became president of the new Republic of Ghana in 1960, after Ghana attains its independence in 1957.

He campaigned ceaselessly for African solidarity and for the liberation of southern Africa from white settler rule. His greatest achievement was to win the right of black peoples in Africa, to have a vote and to determine their own destiny. Nkrumah’s popularity which was like a bush fire in the dry season, brought him fame and also created a lot of enemies against him.

Many famous African-Americans, including Malcolm X, W.E.B Du Bois, Stevie Wonder, Maya Angelou etc. were all in Ghana. In the summer of 1964, Muhammad Ali took a trip to Ghana, a visit the boxer called “a return to the fatherland.” In the VIP room of the Accra Airport, he was greeted by Ghana’s Foreign Minister Kojo Botsio. According to report,  about 10,000 African Americans visit Ghana yearly, and almost 3,000 of them live in the capital, Accra.

On February 24th, 1966, Nkrumah was overthrown in a coup, master-minded by the CIA, after surviving many assassination attempts. He fled to Republic of Guinea to be with his friend Sekou Touré for a number of years and spent his later years in exile in Bucharest, Romania and  died on 27 April 1972.

Exploring Slave Dungeons At Cape Coast Castle

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Tourists exploring a slave dungeon at the Cape Coast castle

The mere mention of slavery brings bad memories, as it harboured unimaginable evil act, as thousands of Africans were captured under inhuman circumstances into overcrowded dungeons and transported across the Atlantic to the New World. Even though slavery is long abolished, the African still bears the psychological scars, as he fights to regain his lost identity and respect among mankind on the surface of the earth today.

The slave trade in Ghana mainly took place at coastal towns, but I wish to write about Cape Coast, my country of birth, which was the center of the British slave trade for almost 150 years. Cape Coast is located in the central region of Ghana. It was the capital of Gold Coast between 1700 until 1877 when the capital was shifted to Accra. Ghana replaced Gold Coast when the country achieved its independence in 1957.

Echoes of sad music in the air can be heard from Cape Coast, attracting thousands of tourists including African-Americans and other Africans in the Diaspora to visit the place, where their ancestors were packed like a sardine into ships for slavery. There is a proverb in Ghana which says “Man doesn’t cry.” I’m beginning to question this proverb if it has any elements of truth because any African in the Diaspora who visits Cape Coast castle can’t hold back his tears.

The psychological effect and emotions over Cape Coast Castle, which still has the remnants of the  slave trade, are unbearable. President Obama, wife, Michelle and children can’t forget the experience of touring the preserved sites. One can’t escape the cold waves which go through the spine. Even though many Africans in the Diaspora haven’t been to Ghana to trace their roots or visit Cape Coast, others had. The Pan African Historical Festival, simply called PANAFEST is a cultural event which has brought thousands of African-Americans to visit Cape Coast.

Visiting Cape Coast Castle to understand the pain and suffering endured by the millions of slaves is an important step for African-Americans and other Africans in the Diaspora to be closer to Africa. It is sad to note that many hate to be referred to as Africans, even though history about their origin isn’t a fabricated story. It seems that’s the way to help forget this bitter experience, but there is nothing satisfying than visiting the continent of your origin to discover the reality aspects of a sad journey.

Forts and castles built by Europeans between 1482 and 1786, serving as slave depots are still visible in Ghana. Apart from the Cape Coast Castle, are also Elmina and Christiansburg Castles.  Ghana invites you. Be part of other tourists to visit Cape Coast, to see the male dungeon, female dungeon, remnants and the reality of cruelty of slavery, committed by White Slave Masters.

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