Culture: White People Learning What It Takes To Be An African

 

Africa

Did curiosity really kill the cat? Why so many white people now interested in the diversity of culture, leading them to Africa, the continent the Western and American media never write anything good about, than Aids, Ebola, war, famine, and crime?

The media plays an important role in the society; unfortunately many don’t see it in that way, because of the type of news they disseminate to the public. I was quite impressed and amazed when I met a white man telling me about his visit to Sierra Leone and Ghana. The fact that he could even speak some of the languages inspired me to find out his reasons for leaving his continent of luxury, to a strange hard living continent like Africa.

“If a white man comes to live in Africa for six months or a year, the Western media hails him  brave and adventurous, with publication appearing in the newspapers, but the same places I visited are where Africans have lived from generation to generation but the media fails to praise them on the same issue,” said the white man. He is right. There is crime everywhere in the world, especially Italy, Britain, Columbia, Brazil, and America, but the media has made South Africa the most dangerous country on earth.

Every year thousands of Europeans travel to Africa, just because they want to know how Africans live, despite the lack of electricity in many villages, medical facilities, water shortage and poor sanitation. It is amazing to see many white people on African streets, with families interacting and learning many things including how to make African meals. Surprisingly some participate in cultural and festival activities dressed in African fashions, especially in Kente cloth.

Despite the lack of teachers and poor educational facilities, an African child can be able to tell one geographically, the capital city of every country in the world, yet ask a white child of the same age, the capital city of Ghana, Sierra Leone, South Africa or any African country. He will tell you “I don’t know,” with quick remarks “Africa is poor,” because that’s all that his geography teacher has taught him.

I am hundred percent sure that if African and European children meet in a quiz competition, the African children would win because they know much about Europe and America than what European and American children know about Africa. This is not an exaggeration but facts based on research I did. Imagine an African student of fourteen in a Belgium school, who doesn’t even know who Patrice Lumumba was, even though her parents come from Congo. This is a tragedy, not sadness. I didn’t blame her because teachers have failed to teach European students enough about Africa.

I wish exchange of program in education and on moral issues, would take some European children to Africa, to learn the reason why despite immense poverty in many parts of Africa, students don’t smoke, commit suicide, no teenage pregnancy, no shooting, stabbing and above all the reason why respect exists in African schools than any school in Europe and America.

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Giving Children A Promising And Better Life

StreetA suffering street-child

The global economic recession and poverty, which have affected Third World countries most, have resulted in the rampant abandoning of babies in gutters, pit latrines, bushes and remote places. Many mothers are giving up their babies for adoption. Some end up selling their babies or deliberately kill them. This inhuman act shows that some children are born into incapable hands.

If one does not really need a child, why should parents bring them into the world to suffer? Training and caring for children, in terms of feeding, clothing, education and health have never been a simple task. It is better for parents to prevent an unwanted pregnancy than to give birth to a child to become a menace to society.

An Eastern University in America conducted a study on the impact made on children by various forces in the society. The study revealed that 31 percent of the influence on a child was attributed to his years, 16 percent came from his school and other organizations. While 53 percent of the impact on his life came from his home.
The duty of bringing up a child is surely the toughest task in the world and quite frankly, it takes knowledge and wisdom to raise up a child. The inability of parents to take proper care of their children have caused many children roaming the streets, especially in Asia, Africa, and South America.
The neglected children sometimes grow up to be juvenile criminals and delinquents. Each year, estimated one million children are abused in America. The suicide rate for 15 to 24, over the past twenty years has increased. Poverty is actually the main problem facing parents in Third World Countries, keeping children from the classroom.

 

Parents who did not get the opportunity to be educated, may feel education is a waste of time, and therefore the child should be engaged in parents trade. In India, hundreds of children are said to be under bondage, working as slaves to defray the debts of their parents. Under some hardships, children are even forced to sell part of their body parts, such as kidney, to raise money for their parents.

In Brazil, children are sprayed by bullets, for the government to collect the bodies from the streets, as a measure to prevent street child explosion. Is this the best solution to prevent street children? When children are thought how to read from the initial stages, they become interested in books. However poor a child’s reading ability is, his interest in reading would improve his knowledge.

Things go wrong for children these days like people don’t know their value in this world. Many organizations are all over Africa to improve children’s education, but the harvest is plentiful, while the labourers are few. It’s an enormous task. Education for children is not a choice, it’s their right and the only way to give these children a better future is through education.

Blood Street – An Urban Fantasy Novel By Carl Alves

“I like to describe Blood Street as True Blood meets The Sopranos, taking place in the streets of Philadelphia.” – Carl Alves
Blood 4

To my knowledge, vampires and mobsters have never been combined in this manner in literature (or any other form of media) before.  So, I think this makes Blood Street a fairly unique book. I’ve certainly never read a novel quite like this one before.  It was also a helluva lot of fun to right.  What I most enjoy to write (and I what I think do a really job with) are fight scenes.  This novel is chocked full of them.  Having fight scenes that involve vampires gave me quite a bit of freedom in writing them, since I didn’t have to stick to the boundaries of things that would be physically impossible for humans.  Vampires don’t have such limitations, so I was able to do quite a bit more with them.

Blood Street is a fast paced thriller. The action, the drama, and the intrigue never relent.  I wanted to write a novel that the reader would have a hard time putting down, and I hope I have achieved that with this novel.

Setting is also very important to the story.  My native Philadelphia is almost like a character in the story, and if you have ever spent any time in the city, I think you will get a kick out of it.  However, the book spans far and wide in a series of flashbacks, taking place in Spain, Norway, Brazil, Egypt, Germany and Newfoundland.    Get your passport ready and be prepared to take a trip around the globe.

Finally, the vampires that you will encounter in Blood Street are not the sparkly kind featured in Twilight.  These are real, honest to goodness nasty vampires, and the mobsters they encounter are just as mean and nasty. Get ready for an old fashioned street fight and find out who will survive on Blood Street.

The Author 
Carl
Carl Alves went to Boston University majoring in Biomedical Engineering.  Carl graduated with a BS degree, and has since worked in the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries.  He later graduated from Lehigh University with an MBA degree.  His debut novel Two For Eternity was released in 2011 by Weaving Dreams Publishing.
           His novel Blood Street was released in 2012 by True Grit Publishing.  His novel Reconquest: Mother Earth is scheduled to be released in 2014 by Montag Press.  His short fiction has appeared in various publications such as Blood Reign Lit, Alien Skin, and Dark Eclipse.  He is a member of the Horror Writers Association and has attended the Penn Writers Conference.
You can visit his website at www.carlalves.com.

The Eighth Wonder Of The World Is Anokye’s Sword In The Ashanti Kingdom Of Ghana?

The Ashanti empire

An Ashanti chief in full gold regalia in Ghana

Without any argument, Africa is a great continent. Europe and America know that the fact that Europe was built on the raw materials, gold, and treasures stolen from Africa. Britain, Holland, Belgium, Portugal etc; all had their share of what was stolen from Africa, then set on the campaign to destroy the continent through ethnic conflict, war and with medical crimes.

 

Africa is only mentioned in the time of crisis, poverty, and diseases but not what it is known for, its vast natural resources, which has fed and continue to feed the advanced countries. According to the ‘Wikipedia,’ The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World is the first known list of the most remarkable creations of classical antiquity; it was based on guidebooks popular among Hellenic sightseers and only includes works located around the Mediterranean rim.

“Christ the Redeemer” statue in Rio de Janeiro,Brazil, a 105-foot-tall (38-meter-tall) statue      is now among the “new seven wonders of the world,” following a global poll to decide a new list of human-made marvels. Human-made marvels? Then the ‘eighth wonder of the world’ may be probably found in the Ashanti region of Ghana.

 

Anokye's golden stool from heaven

Okomfo Anokye’s sacred golden stool which came down from heaven. The stool is still available in the Ashanti kingdom

The story of Okomfo Anokye (Wikipedia)

Okomfo Anokye was born in Awukugua-Akuapim,in Eastern Region of Ghana, West Africa, in the late 1600s. His father, Ano, and mother, Yaa Anubea, were both from Awukugua-Akuapim, part of the Ayade tribe. At the time of his birth, his two palms were firmly held together and could not be separated. Curious to know what he was holding in his hands, his parents tried to separate both palms but to no avail – about two years into his childhood. Inside his palm were totem poles believed to be from the gods.

His parents and family believe he was sent by the gods to lead the Okere people. Later in life, he attained priesthood and was given the title Okomfo; Fetish-Priest. His full name became Okomfo Anokye. His ancestral home (the house he was born in) is opposite the Awukugua Chief Palace. A shrine is also located at Awukugua and is a frequent site of meeting for the Ohum festival in October. The shrine consists of a palm tree, which he climbed wearing his sandals, and a large rock, from which he carved a game of Oware. Other shrine sites are located in Awukugua-Akuapim.

The Golden stool that descended from heaven

The Golden Stool of Ashanti, known as ‘Sika ‘dwa) because it arrived on Friday, is the royal and divine throne of the Akan people (Ashanti people). Okomfo Anokye proved he was a man with powers. With assembled chiefs, he commanded a golden stool to descend from the sky and the stool landed on the lap of the first Asante king, Osei Tutu. Such seats were traditionally symbolic of a chieftain’s leadership, but the Golden Stool is believed to house the spirit of the Asante nation—living, dead and yet to be born.

Is Ghana's Okomfo Anokye's unmovable sword one of the wonders of the world?

Okomfo Anokye’s planted sword : Every means to pull the sword from the ground has failed.

Okomfo Anokye’s planted sword every means to pull from the ground has failed.

As a symbol of the unification of the Ashanti Kingdom, Okomfo Anokye planted a sword and said if anyone removes the sword, then that marks the end of the Ashanti Empire. Dating over three hundred years, the sword Anokye plunged into the earth, remains on the ground of a hospital named after him: Okomfo Anokye Teaching Hospital.

The mysterious sword has invited many tourists worldwide to Kumasi, Ashanti region, but no one has been able to pull it off the ground.  In 1964, when Muhammad Ali visited Ghana, he tried to pull it out, but he couldn’t. Anyway let’s assume that human strength isn’t enough to pull the sword from the earth, but what about other methods including machinery which couldn’t do the job?

In my opinion, the Okomfo Anokye’s sword which no one has been able to pull it from the earth gives the sword the eighth wonder of the world.