“Life Is Very Hard. The Only People Who Really Live Are Those Who Are Harder Than Life Itself.”

Zero 4

There are hundreds of definitions about ‘Life,’ but none gives me its true meaning, than this quote by author Nawal El Salaawi, “Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”  But who is this woman?

Nawal El Saadiaw has been pilloried, censored, imprisoned and exiled for her refusal to accept the oppression imposed on women by gender and class.

In her life and in her writings, this struggle against sexual discrimination has always been linked to a struggle against all forms of oppression: religious, racial, colonial and neo-colonial.

In 1969, she published her first work of non-fiction, Women and Sex ; in 1972, her writings and her struggles led to her dismissal from her job.

From then on there was no respite; imprisonment under Sadat in 1981 was the culmination of the long war she had fought for Egyptian women’s social and intellectual freedom. A Daughter of Isis is the autobiography of this extraordinary woman.

Author Nawal El Salaawi

Zero 5Nawal El Saadawi, also spelled Nawāl al-Saʿdāwī   (born Oct. 27, 1931, Kafr Ṭaḥlah, Egypt), Egyptian public health physician, psychiatrist, author, and advocate of women’s rights. Sometimes described as “the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab world,” El Saadawi was a feminist whose writings and professional career were dedicated to political and sexual rights for women.El Saadawi was educated at Cairo University (M.D., 1955), Columbia University in New York (M.P.H., 1966), and ʿAyn Shams University in Cairo (where she performed psychiatric research in 1972–74). In 1955–65 she worked as a physician at Cairo University and in the Egyptian ministry of health, and in 1966 she became the director-general of the health education department within the ministry.

In 1968 she founded Health magazine, which was shut down by Egyptian authorities several years later, and in 1972 she was expelled from her professional position in the ministry of health because of her book Al-marʾah wa al-jins (1969; Women and Sex), which was condemned by religious and political authorities.

El Saadawi was jailed in September 1981, and during the two months of her imprisonment she wrote Mudhakkirāt fī sijn al-nisāʾ (1984; Memoirs from the Women’s Prison) on a roll of toilet paper using a smuggled cosmetic pencil.

In 1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and religious opponents, including accusations of apostasy.

In 2002 a legal attempt was made by an Islamist lawyer to forcibly divorce her from her husband, and in May 2008 she won a case that had been brought against her by al-Azhar University, the major centre of Islamic learning, that included charges of apostasy and heresy.

El Saadawi’s novels, short stories, and nonfiction deal chiefly with the status of Arab women, as inMudhakkirāt tabībah (1960; Memoirs of a Woman Doctor), Al-khayt wa al-jidār (1972; The Thread and the Wall), Al-wajh al-ʿarī lī al-marʾah al-arabiyyah (1977; The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World), Al-ḥubb fī zaman al-nafṭ (1993; Love in the Kingdom of Oil), and Al-riwāyah (2004; The Novel).

The oppression of women by men through religion is the underlying theme of El Saadawi’s novel set in a mental institution, Jannāt wa Iblīs (1992; Jannāt and Iblīs). The female protagonists are Jannāt, whose name is the plural of the Arabic word for paradise, and Iblīs, whose name refers to the devil.

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Failure Is A Lesson That Encourages And Improves The Quality Of Life

 

Life is precious than silver and gold

Having faith in God builds one strong to avoid depression, loneliness and the tendencies of suicidal

I have heard many times that ‘Failure is not an option.’ Does it mean that we have to be perfect and successful in whatever we want to achieve in life? How can that be possible? Because since we are human beings and imperfect, we shall continue to experience many setbacks, including failure and disappointment in daily in our lives.

In relationships, careers and businesses, we are all bound to suffer certain problems. The question is, how do we handle or take it personally when we encounter such painful defeats and failures? I have seen it sports, tournaments and in certain fields of activities, participants emotionally and psychologically break down in distress, because they failed to achieve what they aimed at.

Life isn’t an easy journey if you want to achieve something genuinely. Many like to avoid life pitfalls or turmoil, by choosing a wrong path or shortcut. You can see them driving expensive cars and dwelling in beautiful mansions, but you don’t know what they do for the living.

When you see them like that, many wish they are one of them, but be careful to wish you are someone until you read the front page of newspapers that the person you wished to be, has been arrested at one of the international airports, in possession of heroin or cocaine. Would you like your life to end up in this way, because you wanted to avoid life’s failures and disappointments?

The world is full of great people; sometimes your eyes will be filled with tears, when you read their autobiographies to know what they went through before achieving success. In life, failure or disappointment teaches one to be perfect. It worth therefore to see failure as one of the life’s tools which educate and shapes life in a positive way.

My passion to be a writer was easier in Africa than Europe, yet when I was in Africa, I thought Europe will be the right place for me to achieve my aims and objectives. Once in Antwerp, Belgium, I tried to raise a fund to enhance the publication of one of my books. It turns out to be one of the biggest failures in my life.

I couldn’t raise a cent, but this embarrassment wasn’t only what happened. I became a laughing puppet at the school where I’m working. It became a talk of the town with gossips and laughter. Instead of being sad or depressed, I embraced and accepted it as one of the life’s challenges to continue writing without looking back.

People do things you may find it hard to believe. I don’t even think children will do what they did. The failure of the fundraising also taught me to be careful those I contact to demand bread. If one fails to accept failures and disappointments as instruments destined to educate and propel your career to the highest peak, you may end up at the psychiatry with depression or mental problems.