Top 20 African Countries Stink Of Corruption

Women sell food from their canoe at Makoko fishing community in LagosLagos: The Makoko slum in oil rich Nigeria crippled by corruption

In the abundance of water, is the fool thirsty? Africa is blessed with natural resources such as gold, oil, diamonds, cobalt, iron, copper, uranium, silver, bauxite, cocoa beans and petroleum etc. Unfortunately the standard of living of many people in the continent is deplorable. This is largely due to corrupt governments ruling many countries in the African continent.

Transparency International has been publishing the corruption perceptions index (CPI) since the turn of the new millennium. If a country has a CPI of 100 it is very clean. If the score is 0, then the country is highly corrupt.

Here is a brief overview of the top 20 most corrupt nations in Africa as of 2014, according to Transparency International.

=24. Mozambique (CPI score: 31)
Although the government of Mozambique has taken steps to fight corruption, its still a big problem. Corruption remains in both the public and donors, who support almost half of the nation’s budget.

=24. Sierra Leone (CPI score: 31)
Systematic corruption has caused weak governance and widespread poverty in Sierra Leone. The anti-corruption institutions still lack resources, staff and expertise.

=24. Tanzania (CPI score: 31)
Although there are comprehensive laws to fight corruption, its still a serious problems in Tanzania with bribery is often demanded in the business sector.

23. Mauritania (CPI score: 30)
Corruption has become deeply entrenched in Mauritania. Part of what fuels corruption in this nation is the insufficient information or absence of transparency about local companies, the identities of their owners, and financial report.

=21. Gambia (CPI score: 29)
Gambia’s judiciary is subject to pervasive political interference, and there is corruption in many parts of the government.

=21. Togo (CPI score: 29)
Corruption in Togo is common and those involved rarely punish. Corruption more among prison and police officers, and members of the judiciary.

20. Madagascar (CPI score: 28)
Madagascar is one of the world’s poorest countries and has had a negative growth due to corruption.

=18. Cameroon (CPI score: 27)
In Cameroon, many corrupt civil servants drive around in their expensive luxury cars. People who try to bring these corrupt officers to justice pay a high price.

=18. Nigeria (CPI score: 27)
Political corruption pervades Nigeria. The rise of public administration and discovery of petroleum and natural gas have led to corrupt practices.

=16. Comoros (CPI score: 26)
Corruption remained a serious problem in Comoros, it lacks rule of law. The nation gained independence from France in 1975. Since then it has witnessed around 20 coups or coup attempts.

=16. Uganda (CPI score: 26)
Even though the country has experienced high growth rates in recent years, corruption remains widespread at all levels.

=14. Guinea (CPI score: 25)
Rampant corruption in Guinea is hindering economic growth and increasing drug trafficking.

=14. Kenya (CPI score: 25)
Political corruption in the post-colonial government of Kenya has had a history which spans the era of the Jomo Kenyatta and Daniel arap Moi’s KANU governments to Mwai Kibaki’s PNU government. Experts estimate that an average urban Kenyan pays 16 bribes in a month.

13. Central African Republic (CPI score: 24)
Growth of Central African Republic is significantly hindered by wide spread corruption. Corruption is rife and undermines timber and diamond industries.

12. Republic of Congo (CPI score: 23)
In spite of its oil wealth, Republic of Congo is one of the most indebted nations in the world. This is largely due to rampant corruption.

=10. Chad (CPI score: 22)
Feud and corruption are blocking Chad’s economic growth. Revenue from oil is not spent responsibly. Corruption rules this nation.

=10. Democratic Republic of Congo (CPI score: 22)
As the nation emerges from a long period of violence and instability, it struggles with a legacy of entrenched corruption at all levels.

=9. Zimbabwe (CPI score: 21)
Corruption in Zimbabwe has become endemic within its political, private and civil sectors. In 2011, finance minister Tendai Biti claimed that at least $1 billion in diamond related revenue owed to the national treasury remains unaccounted for.

8. Burundi (CPI score: 20)
Despite the establishment of anti-corruption agencies, Burundi is remains a corrupt country in sub-Saharan Africa.

=6. Angola (CPI score: 19)
Corruption is a pervasive phenomenon in Angola. The current government is working on containing corruption by enacting laws and enforcing integrity systems.

=6. Guinea Bissau (CPI score: 19)
Guinea Bissau was once hailed as a potential model for African development. Today it is one of the poorest nations in the world. This is largely due to corruption among high-ranking officials.

=4. Eritrea (CPI score: 18)
People in Eritrea are living in a fear-ridden environment. Corruption and greed are rampant among the members of the ruling party.

=4. Libya (CPI score: 18)
Before the downfall of the Qadhafi regime in 2011, weak rule of law and systematic corruption had largely marginalized private sector activity in the nation. Corruption is the biggest problem facing Libya today.

Abacha 2

Former Nigeria’s head of state, late Sani Abacha stole $458 million and hid in bank accounts around the world, while thousands of Nigerians live in poverty.

3. South Sudan (CPI score: 15)

Since independence, South Sudan has taken steps to promote transparency and accountability in an endeavor to eliminate corruption. Unfortunately political will is lacking in effective implementation of anti-corruption policies.

2. Sudan (CPI score: 11)
Top ranking government officials are frequently involved in corrupt practices in Sudan. This has impacted the economic growth negatively. It is a huge challenge to do business in Sudan. Sectors like construction and transportation are prone to corruption.

1. Somalia (CPI score: cool
The Federal Republic of Somalia is located in the horn of Africa. Around 10 million people live in this country. It is the most corrupt nation in the world. There is lack of accountability in receipt and expenditure of public funds. Currently a parliamentary finance committee has been established to oversee all withdrawal transactions from the Central Bank, which is Somalia’s official monetary authority.

If the above-mentioned nations tackle corruption effectively, they will be able to enhance the standard of living of their people significantly.

Source: http://www.richestlifestyle.com/most-corrupt-countries-in-africa/

WWE: The Authority Still Fear Ex-Members Of The Shield Without Seth Rollins

Triple

Triple H and wife, Stephanie McMahon: Pride, ego and arrogant couple.

WWE  has been my best entertainment, not only because of my favourite wrestlers that sacrifice their bodies each week, to thrill fans but because of the stories behind it and what unfolds every week.

It’s good for a man to support his wife in running a business, but the pride of Stephanie McMahon, as the daughter of the Vince McMahon, the owner of WWE, has blinded Triple H, to follow his wife unwisely sometimes in running the affairs of WWE.

How many men or wrestlers, has Stephanie slapped across the face, including Daniel Bryan and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson? If she truly wants everyone to believe that she respects and loves her husband, Triple H, then she must give the same respect to wrestlers in and out of WWE.

Pride and ego have taken over her heart to the extent that, she thinks her father’s industry, feeds the entire American nation and all the wrestlers under the canopy of WWE, without realizing that there wouldn’t be any WWE today; if there are no fans or wrestlers.

They can run WWE at 9.99, but as a man dies, dry leaves fall and the mighty dollar falls sometimes, when the WWE fans begin to boycott the matches one day, they will understand that without them WWE is nothing and without the wrestlers, the company has no future.

The question everyone wants to ask Triple H is, why a sudden handshake request from Roman Reigns, after the injury of Seth Rollins? How does he want Reigns to react after masterminding the betrayal of  Dean Ambrose and him, by Seth Rollins? According to Triple H, for a very long time he has Roman Reigns in mind.

That’s a big lie. He lied, trying to build a good relationship with someone he feared. Surprisingly, WWE fans even knew he lied. Since Reigns didn’t cooperate, he has become Triple H’s enemy. Believe me, Triple H will do his underground work or everything to prevent Roman Reign getting hold of the world championship belt, but time will tell.

Ambrose

Dean Ambrose and Roman Reigns: The two biggest threats in WWE today.

The latest development on Monday Night Raw, 11/30/2015, evidently reveals the fear in the eyes of the authority, in regard to Roman Reigns and Dean Ambrose. At backstage, Reigns is talking to Dean Ambrose and The Usos when Triple H and Stephanie McMahon appear and asked Reigns to return the belt.

He laughs, and instead of Triple H, he gives it to Stephanie. He tells Triple H to tell Sheamus that he will take back the belt at TLC. Triple H replies, he already spoke to the champ, and he wants to put the belt on the line tonight. Roman is delighted, and Stephanie adds that he must win in 5:15. Why to defeat Sheamus within this short time? Since they can’t control Reigns, if he becomes world champion, they will do everything to prevent him from achieving his goals.

Later Triple H tells Dean Ambrose that if Reigns loses he match, then Ambrose loses his shot as number one contender to wrestle Kevin Owens for the Inter-Continental championship belt, because Reigns need to learn that his actions affect others. Why such harsh decisions? All come to the same answer, fear. The authority can’t deny that.

The authority may choose to manage WWE with iron fist, just  to dominate the wrestlers, but not everyone will yield to that domination. We have seen such wrestlers before in Randy Orton, CM Punk, John Cena etc;  now it’s Roman Reigns. He is not scared to hear “You’re firrrred.”

Do You Want To Be Free Of Fear Of The Authority? Keep Doing Good

Gang

If you live in a glass house, there is a strict rule to follow. Don’t throw stones. Many don’t respect the authority, they disobey their parents, ignore their teachers and live reckless lives. Affected by problems at home, including divorce, alcoholism and drug abuse, they grow to be criminals, finding it hard to obey rules and respect the authority. At the end, they find themselves in the net of the law.

Surprisingly, people you may not suspect to be deceptive and cunning, also go against the law. Many celebrities and rich people don’t give respect to authorities, as law-abiding citizens. They evade tax. Every crime deserves punishment, yet those who commit crime, try to find ways and means to erase everything possibly to link them up to that crime to avoid prison sentence.

If investigation leads  criminals to prison, many refuse to obey the authorities, or have a changed character to demand early release, instead they plan prison escape. They don’t want to serve time in prison, yet they commit crime. Drug offense in many countries in Asia carries death penalty, yet people try to smuggle drugs to Asia.  Do we have to shed tears for people that get involved in such acts, when they have conscience to know good and evil?

One of the powerful ways to cultivate humility, humbleness, submissiveness and to get rid of pride, is to remain in God’s love. The devil has work for idle hands, so keep yourself busy by alienating from things that may put you into trouble. There is nothing that gives satisfaction and happiness to man, than to give Caesar what belongs to him (paying your tax) and give to God what belongs to God (To follow His teachings) to resist the temptations of the world.

One Man, One Wife

Aluko’s One Man, One Wife (1959), a satirical novel about the conflict of Christian and Yoruba ethics, relates the disillusionment of a village community with the tenets of missionary Christianity. A second novel, One Man, One Matchet (1964), humorously presents the clash of an inexperienced district officer with an unscrupulous politician. Kinsman and Foreman (1966)

Wife

One Man, One Wife (1959), was equally shrewd in its depiction of village politics, pitting Christians against the authority of traditional chiefs. Other novels include Kinsman and Foreman (1966), about a civil servant’s struggles to resist the demands of his relations; Chief the Honourable Minister (1970), which deals with the problems of government at the top.

His Worshipped Majesty (1972), which focuses on the loss of political power by traditional chiefs; and Wrong Ones in the Dock (1982), which denounces certain aspects of the Nigerian legal system. Despite his exposure of political chicanery, Aluko, unlike many other prominent African novelists, such as Chinua Achebe and Ngugi wa Thiong’o, appears to be a champion of the post-independence élites in government and civil service.

The Author

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T. M. Aluko, Nigerian novelist, is significantly undervalued in comparison to many of his contemporaries in the so-called ‘first generation’ of Nigerian writers. Although he is concerned with such commonly treated themes as the impact of Western modernity on traditional Nigerian culture and the social and political failings of the postcolonial era, Aluko has approached his subjects with a comic detachment that is largely at odds with the more serious mood of most West African fiction. As a result he has been neglected and even dismissed by many critics.

Timothy Mofolorunso Aluko, a member of the Yoruba tribe, was born on 14 June 1918 in Ilesha, western Nigeria. He received a colonial education, attending primary school in Ilesha, at Government College Ibadan and Yaba Higher College near Lagos. From 1942 to 1946 Aluko worked as a junior engineer in the Public Works departments of Lagos and Ilorin.

During this period he also began to earn recognition for his short stories, the first of which, ‘The New Engineer’, appeared in the anthology African New Writing (1947), edited by T. Cullen Young. Travelling to England in 1946, he resumed his studies at King’s College, London, where he graduated in civil engineering and town planning in 1950.

Alongside his academic work, Aluko also became a regular contributor to the Liverpool-based West African Review. It was in that journal that he published his prescient essay, ‘Case for Fiction’, in which he argues the need for literature that is written by Africans, about African subjects, and for an African readership; in it he also outlines the various dilemmas and impediments faced by African writers of that time.

In 1950 Aluko returned to Nigeria to become a senior public-works engineer, working in various different cities. Also that year he married Janet Adebisi Fajemisin, with whom he had six children.

http://www.amazon.com/One-Wife-African-Writers-Series/dp/0435900307