The Inside Story Of The Influence Of Peter Tosh On Lucky Dube

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Lucky Dube and Peter Tosh

Like many writers, some of the great musicians all have stories to tell over what or who influenced them to reach the highest peak of their musical career. It will be recalled that one day, Burning Spear met Bob Marley on his way to the farm and he spoke to him about his music ambitions. Bob Marley then directed Burning Spear to go to ‘Studio One.’

That was the beginning of Burning Spear’s successful musical career. With a good heart, he gave credit to Bob Marley in his song “As it is” taken from his album ” Calling Rastafari.” He sings, “I start singing in the late sixties. Told about Studio One by Bob Marley.”

Out of the three original trios of  ‘The Wailers’ Lucky Dube likes Peter Tosh. There must be some reasons. Lucky was a victim of Apartheid. During the Apartheid era, two white men with bull dogs were bragging about how strong and wild the dogs are. Unfortunately, Lucky appeared there at a wrong time and the owners let go the dogs on him. Lucky Dube said this sad story in one of his interviews.

While world leaders, including Margaret Thatcher, were supporting Apartheid, concerned Peter Tosh, was probably the first musician to play the tune ‘Apartheid,’ expressing his anger against the injustice and sufferings of South Africans, before other musicians followed him. This is a significant example if Lucky Dube likes Peter Tosh. Reggae music is not only to be listened to but also to be studied.

Lucky Dube honoured Peter Tosh

Now let’s find out the love Lucky Dube had for Peter Tosh. In one of the songs of Peter Tosh, ‘Glass House,’ Peter Tosh sang “Harm no man, Let no man harm you, Do unto others, As they would do to you, And to every baldhead, Respect the Rastaman Cause he’s the only man left on creation.” The latter, “Respect the Rastaman cause he’s the only man left on creation,” is what I want to lay my emphasis on.

 In 1991, Lucky Dube released the remarkable album named ‘PRISONER.’ On the track called “Reggae Strong,” Lucky Dube honoured and paid a tribute to Peter Tosh unnoticed by singing, ” Killing the prophets of reggae, Destroying the prophets of reggae, But somebody said to all the bald heads Respect the rastaman ‘Cause he’s the only one
Only one left in Jah creation.” (He referred to Peter Tosh here.)

During my interview with Lucky, he confirmed his likeness to Peter and said; “Peter Tosh was a great singer, so I feel honoured if people say that I sing like him.” He similarly honoured Bob Marley too, while singing the song ‘VICTIM,’ saying “Bob Marley said
“How long shall they kill our prophets, While we stand aside and look But little did he know that eventually the enemy will stand aside and look while we slash and kill.”

“Reggae in the bathroom, Reggae in the bedroom, Reggae everywhere, Reggae in jail, reggae in church, Everybody likes it.” Lucky Dube was a kind of musician no one can fill his shoes, after his tragic departure from this earth because he was the only Lucky Dube and his music was exceptional and a masterpiece.

Amazon page of Lucky Dube: https://www.amazon.com/Lucky-Dube/e/B000APVHAW

In The Shoes Of Steve Biko: I Write What I Like

Steve Biko sacrificed his life to make what South Africa is today

Steve Biko was the father of the Black Consciousness Movement in South Africa. In 1977, while in custody, he was severely beaten to death.

During the Apartheid era, the Dutch government through legislation came up with laws that restricted the mixing of non-white South Africans and whites. World leaders, including Margaret Thatcher, the former British prime minister, and the foreign media kept sealed lips and watched the crimes, atrocities, discrimination, grim terror and repression against South Africans.

The saddest part of the story is the imprisonment of some of the ANC members, including Nelson Mandela for 27 years, at the notorious Robben Island prisons, for his efforts to end Apartheid in his country, and the brutal murder of Steve Biko, whose articles against Apartheid he named ‘I write what I like’ were considered a threat to national security.

Despite Mandela’s legacy in fighting apartheid and helping South Africa seek healing and forgiveness, nothing has changed significantly in South Africa and around the world in regards to racism and discrimination against blacks. During the Apartheid era the foreign media failed the entire Africa, including South Africans, history has repeated itself again as we see the incompetence of the foreign media again on African issues.

In journalism, the foreign media think there are certain facts about diseases, such as Aids, Ebola, Lassa fever etc, which needed to be hidden from the public, as a measure to protect the image of their country. America, Belgium, France, Holland etc, had a hand in the Aids and Ebola medical crimes against Africa, but they continue to enjoy impunity and the support of the foreign media.

Just imagine, Belgium is now at war against terrorism, fighting hard against crime, yet the media has failed to address Belgium as a country supporting crime. If there is no statue of Hitler for killing six million Jews, why should they erect a statue of a king that maimed and killed over 10 million Africans, including women and children? Are they not supporting crime? Journalism without integrity and honesty is similar to a country ruled by a corrupt politician. 

As an African writer, I take a serious look at the setbacks and flaws of the foreign journalism. When it comes to issues pertaining Africa, there is always partiality in the foreign journalism.They find it very hard to write the truth and it will always remain the same as long as they can’t write the truth of the origins of Aids and Ebola.

There are codes of ethics governing journalism but it’s completely abused. One can hold a degree or diploma in journalism, but once you are not obeying the rules of journalism, means you are not a qualified journalist. I like what I write even if it generates hate. That will not change my style of writing because I’m proud to be a true born African and I will continue to defend my continent against lies and injustice.

Life in Apartheid-Era South Africa

THE LOVE PETER TOSH HAD FOR AFRICA

The legendary Peter Tosh

“I am that I am”: The legendary Peter Tosh

There are thousands of Africans in the Diaspora. Many hate to be called Africans,  some love the continent but never had the chance to visit there, while others frequently visit Africa. One of them was the legendary Peter Tosh, one of the founding members of the original Wailers trio.

The fearless tough man, whose vicious wit marked militant tunes made him an international figure, visited Africa including Nigeria on many occasions. I never had the opportunity to see Peter Tosh performing but I had a glimpse of him when he visited Nigeria and followed his activities in the country through ‘The Punch Newspaper.’

 

Sunny Okosun

Sunny Okosun, one of the giants of Nigeria’s contemporary music

Peter Tosh was in Nigeria in 1982. During his visit, he stayed in the house of Sunny Okosun, another great Nigerian musician interested in the well-being of people. It’s like the two had something in common. In Nigeria Sunny Okosun’s ‘Fire in Soweto, Papa’s Land’ etc, became international hits, for his concern for the suffering South Africans under Apartheid regime.

While in Jamaica, Peter Tosh recorded ‘Apartheid’ on his ‘Equal Rights’ album. “Inna me land dig out me gold, pearl, diamond, we gonna fight against Apartheid.” It’s not a surprise, that the two musicians were great friends. In 1983 while still in Lagos, Peter Tosh revisited Nigeria. This time, he cemented his love for his dear Africa by composing the song he named ‘Mama Africa.’

 

Andrew Tosh, son of the legendary Peter Tosh

Andrew Tosh, son of the legendary Peter Tosh and writer Joel Savage

“Two thousand years of black history can’t be wiped away so easily,” sings Bob Marley in ‘Zion Train.’ Definitely, the achievements of Peter Tosh in the field of music can’t be easily forgotten. On April 20, 2016, Jamaica celebrated second official International Peter Tosh Day. Like the sons of Bob Marley, Andrew Tosh is carrying on the works of his father.

http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ/