Technology Can Help Improve Your Life, Yet You Can’t Cheat Nature

Dolly

‘Joseph’s coat of many colors’ couldn’t prevent Dolly Parton from plastic surgery. Wasn’t she beautiful before the surgical operation?

Once working in Amsterdam, I said to my colleague: “The old photographs of Michael Jackson show how handsome he was, wondering the motive behind his nose job.”

The colleague looked at me and said: “If you have money like Michael Jackson, believe me, you will do more than what he did. Money tells people what to do, you’re poor the reason you’re criticizing him.”

I didn’t argue with him but I thought of what he said to me the whole day. I have never hated any part of my body since from my youth and through my adulthood. So what does he mean that if I have money I will do more than what he did?

It’s unfortunate that many people don’t like they way they look or hate something particularly on the body, which they think don’t make them attractive.

As modern technology advances, people that want to change something on the body are actively engaged to plastic surgery, despite apparent negative consequences.

Those who undergo surgical correction may seem very happy after the operation some few years later, but I don’t have words to describe how horrible some of them looked like in their ripe age.

Whether smaller nose,  sexy lips, tighter tummy or perkier breasts, plastic surgery can take it’s toll on your health one day. Many went under knife to be beautiful, but at the moment they looked like creatures from different planet trying to find home among us.

Yes, technology can improve your health and life but you can never cheat nature. Your body and leg reveal you are over fifty but your face reveals you are about thirty-five or you wear mask. Are you satisfied about that? Don’t deceive yourself.

When Will I See You Pippi Longstocking?

Pippi 8

Images of the beautiful chapters of Pippi Longstocking’s life

One of the favourite children’s program channeled worldwide under different languages is Inger Nilsson, alias Pippi Longstocking. The cute little redheaded girl from Sweden, moves into her father’s cottage Villa Villekula, and meets her next door neighbours Tommy and Annika.

The face of wonderful little Pippi, is still shown all over the world, but one will be surprise to see the beautiful chapters of Pippi’s life, as she grows from little naughty girl to a real lady and then to her ripe age.

As an adult, I love watching Pippi too wuth the children. She has a wonderful horse, mouse and monkey, but what I like most about her, is her pointed rough old shoes. The above photographs are some of Pippi’s from a young girl to adulthood.

She is still beautiful, do you agree with me? If I get the opportunity one day, I would love to visit her to get a portion of her magic wand, to lift up heavy objects, since she could lift up a whole horse. 

The Fultz Quadruplets: Born At The Wrong Time In America?

Ebony

The Fultz Quadruplets were the first identical Black quad babies born in the United States. The Fultz girls became baby celebrities, while Fred Klenner, the white doctor who delivered them into the world, exploited them for fame and money.

The Fultz Quads – Mary Louise, Mary Ann, Mary Alice, and Mary Catherine – were born on May 3, 1946 at Annie Penn Hospital in Reidsville, N.C. The Quads’ parents, sharecropper Pete and deaf-mute mother Annie Mae, lived on a farm with their six other children but were too poor to care for the babies. Multiple births were rare at the time and the equipment to care for underweight babies wasn’t as prevalent as it is in modern times.

The girls were delivered in what was known as “the Basement,” according to a 2002 report by journalist and educator Lorraine Ahearn. This “basement” was the Blacks-only wing of Annie Penn, and Klenner and Black nurse Margaret Ware helped Annie Mae give birth. Since the Fultz family couldn’t read or write, Dr. Klenner  named the girls after his own family members.

When news of the quads began to spread nationwide, curious onlookers and media began sniffing around for photo opportunities. At the time, baby formula companies such as Gerber and PET wanted to use the quads as a means to start an ad campaign to sell their wares in the Black community. Black families didn’t buy formula during the late ’40’s, as many mothers opted to breast feed because of the high cost of baby formula.

Klenner struck a deal with PET for an undisclosed amount and the Fultz Quads were well on their way to becoming stars.  The quads’ starred in ads in Ebony Magazine, and they even made the cover of the publication. But all of this notoriety came with a price as Klenner used the girls for his “Vitamin C therapy” that he claimed made the girls healthy along with the PET evaporated milk formula.

While Klenner reaped the financial benefits, PET Milk company gave the Fultz quads a farm, a nurse, food, and medical care. Even more shocking, when Klenner returned the girls home, he displayed them in a glass-enclosed nursery. In a follow up story reported by Ebony, the then 22-year-old sisters were ultimately adopted by the nurse PET assigned to them and her husband. They struggled with adulthood. The farm they were given was on difficult land, and Pet paid the quads just $350 a month, leaving them virtually broke.

The girls became the third set of quadruplets in America to survive until adulthood. But according to Ahearn’s story, three of the sisters died of breast cancer before age 55, with Catherine Fultz Griffin believed to be the last surviving Fultz quadruplet.

Originally published by NlackAmricaweb.com

http://blackamericaweb.com/2015/06/10/little-known-black-history-fact-the-fultz-quadruplets/