Government Zero: No Borders, No Language, No Culture

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From bestselling author of Stop the Coming Civil War, Michael Savage reveals the massive dangers currently leading to the demise of our government.

Michael Savage has been warning Americans for decades and now it’s here. In GOVERNMENT ZERO: No Borders, No Language, No Culture, Savage sounds the alarm about how progressives and radical Islamists are each unwittingly working towards similar ends: to destroy Western Civilization and remake it in their own respective images. These two dark forces are transforming our once-free republic into a socialist, Third World dictatorship ruled by Government Zero: absolute government and zero representation.

Combining in-depth analysis with biting commentary, Savage cuts through mainstream media propaganda to reveal an all-out attack on our borders, language and culture by progressive travelers who have hijacked public policy from national defense to immigration to public education.

Find out everything you need to know about this terrifying agenda to weaken the U.S. military, cripple the American economy, subvert basic American liberties such as freedom of speech, and destroy the international world order.

There is no time to lose. The Progressive-Islamist agenda has advanced into every public space, from the White House to the military to your local public school. If America is to survive, it has to be stopped. Michael Savage has a plan. Get the inside story before it’s too late.

The Author

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Dr. Michael Savage is a multimedia icon in the conservative movement, heard by 10 million listeners a week on “The Michael Savage Show” and syndicated across the U.S. in more than 300 markets. He is also the author of 25 books, including four New York Times best-sellers. In 2007, his media presence and profile earned him the coveted “Freedom of Speech Award” from Talkers Magazine.

His passion to unearth the truth about liberalism, borders, language and culture, and his unparalleled stand for America’s families, has made him the most important figure in the fight for free speech and ideals in America today.

He is the only member of the U.S. media ever blacklisted and banned from a Western nation. His ban from visiting Britain in June 2009 has made him the “poster child” for free speech, not only for Americans concerned about the cultural shift towards totalitarianism and their rights to freedom of expression, but for people around the globe. In mid-2009, this worldwide media attention concerning the ban resulted in a New Yorker magazine profile of him.

Savage’s first novel, “Abuse of Power,” became a New York Times best-seller in September. The thriller is a fictionalized account of being banned from Britain and hunted by overbearing governments.

Dr. Savage holds a master’s degree in medical botany and a second in medical anthropology. Additionally, he earned his PhD. from the University of California at Berkeley in epidemiology and nutrition sciences. He is an ardent conservationist, is dedicated to his family and is a proud patriot of his country.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&text=Michael+Savage&search-alias=books&field-author=Michael+Savage&sort=relevancerank

It’s Just Beautiful A Woman Holds Her Breast When Running, But That Doesn’t Mean It’s Going To Fall Off

 

Kente is now internationally known and often used by African-Americans

The slice of Ghanaian culture presented in Kente cloth by a pretty woman

The diversity of culture is very interesting and broad subject. I like to share interesting articles with readers eager to know about other people’s culture, custom and heritage. Africans used proverbs a lot in their daily conversation and admonition. 

In 1985, my first time in Freetown, Sierra Leone, I entered into a restaurant and ordered for a plate of rice. On top of my rice was a strange greenish stew, which wasn’t good for me after tasting it. I asked the woman what it was and she told me it was prepared by cassava leaves.

She said I can try potato leaves stew,  if I want. I said ‘No’ and I went away. Months after living in Freetown and knowing much about their culture and food, I found out how delicious cassava leaves stew was. From time to time, I requested for the food I once rejected, any I went to the restaurant. It’s interesting to know about someone’s culture and food.

“It’s just beautiful a woman holds her breast when running, but that doesn’t mean it’s  going to fall off,” is one of Ghana’s intriguing proverbs.

The sight of a woman creates first impression. There are many things that put men off, especially when a woman’s hair isn’t well styled or when shabbily dressed.

In Africa it’s very common to see women running. I don’t think any one will find a woman attractive as her breasts flap on her chest as she runs.

Holding her breast while running, is one of the ways revealing how conscious a woman is over her body and truly men find it nice in that way too.

World’s Top AIDS Researchers Were Among Those Killed In MH17 Tragedy

Research 1THE world’s best AIDS researchers perished in the Malaysia Airlines crash leaving a gaping hole in the field.

There were scores of AIDS activists, researchers and health workers on board the ill-fated flight bound for 20th International AIDS Conference starting in Melbourne before the tragedy.

Among the dead was prominent Dutch researcher Joep Lange, who has been a pioneer in HIV research and research since the early eighties.

He was the former president of the International Aids Society and his work included preventing HIV being transmitted from a mother to their child.

Other notable delegates who died were Dr Lucie van Mens, who since 1995 has focused on HIV and AIDs prevention and the World Health Organisation’s Glenn Thomas.

AIDs campaigners Pim de Kuijer and Jacqueline van Tongeren were also among the dead.

James Baldwin’s Advice on Writing

“Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.”

James Baldwin’s Advice on Writing

In 1989, Paris Review founding editor and trailblazing interviewer George Plimpton edited a wonderful collection titled The Writer’s Chapbook: A Compendium of Fact, Opinion, Wit, and Advice from the 20th Century’s Preeminent Writers (public library). Among them was novelist, poet, essayist, and playwright James Baldwin (August 2, 1924–December 1, 1987), whom Plimpton had interviewed on two separate occasions in early 1984, half a century after Baldwin read his way out of Harlem and into the pantheon of literary greatness.

In a fantastic addition to the collected wisdom of celebrated writers, Baldwin looks back on his formidable career and shares what he has learned about the creative process, the psychological drivers of writing, and the habits of mind one must cultivate in order to excel at the craft.

James Baldwin with Shakespeare, 1969 (Photograph: Allan Warren)

Reflecting on what motivates great writers to write — an enduring question also addressed beautifully by George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, Italo Calvino, andWilliam Faulkner — Baldwin sides with Bukowski and argues that the supreme animating force of the writer is the irrepressible impossibility of not-writing:

Something that irritates you and won’t let you go. That’s the anguish of it. Do this book, or die. You have to go through that. Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.

Endurance, indeed, is perhaps the sole common denominator among successful authors. Any aspiring writer, he admonishes, should have no illusion about the endurance required but should want to write anyway. A generation after Jack Kerouac considered the vital difference between talent and genius, Baldwin notes:

If you are going to be a writer there is nothing I can say to stop you; if you’re not going to be a writer nothing I can say will help you. What you really need at the beginning is somebody to let you know that the effort is real.

In a sentiment reminiscent of Joan Didion’s observation that she writes in order to gain better access to her own mind, Baldwin speaks to the consciousness-clarifying function of the creative impulse:

When you’re writing, you’re trying to find out something which you don’t know. The whole language of writing for me is finding out what you don’t want to know, what you don’t want to find out. But something forces you to anyway.

Much of that self-revelation, Baldwin points out, happens not during the first outpour of writing but during the grueling process of rewriting. Echoing Hemingway’s abiding wisdom on the crucial art of revision, he adds:

Rewriting [is] very painful. You know it’s finished when you can’t do anything more to it, though it’s never exactly the way you want it… The hardest thing in the world is simplicity. And the most fearful thing, too. You have to strip yourself of all your disguises, some of which you didn’t know you had. You want to write a sentence as clean as a bone. That is the goal.

But as essential as that sense of incompleteness may be in guiding the revision process, it must be mediated by the awareness that completeness is a perennial mirage. (Decades later, Zadie Smith would observe in her ten rules of writing: “Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.”) Baldwin offers:

When you’ve finished a novel, it means, “The train stops here, you have to get off here.” You never get the book you wanted, you settle for the book you get. I’ve always felt that when a book ended there was something I didn’t see, and usually when I remark the discovery it’s too late to do anything about it.

Adding to the endlessly fascinating daily rhythms of great writers, which reflect the wide range of differences in the cognitive conditions of the ideal writing routine, Baldwin shares his work habits:

I start working when everyone has gone to bed. I’ve had to do that ever since I was young — I had to wait until the kids were asleep. And then I was working at various jobs during the day. I’ve always had to write at night. But now that I’m established I do it because I’m alone at night.

Complement The Writer’s Chapbook — a treasure so wisdom-packed that it is a tragedy to see it fall out of print — with Joseph Conrad on what makes a great writer, Willa Cather on the life-changing advice that made her a writer, and Jane Kenyon on what remains the finest ethos to write and live by, then revisit Baldwin on the artist’s role in society and his terrifically timely conversation with Margaret Mead about race and identity.

http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Chapbook-Compendium-Centurys-Preeminent/dp/B000NPS9KU

First Case Of Sexual Transmission Of Zika Virus Reported

Lovers 5Published in LA WEEKLY BY DENNIS ROMERO

Zika’s a particularly evil little virus that could cause microcephaly, a rare neurological condition that causes affected infants to be born with abnormally small heads. This week the U.S. Centers for Disease Control announced a recent case of sexually transmitted Zika reported  in the Dallas area.

“According to a Dallas County Health Department investigation, a person who recently traveled to an area with Zika virus transmission returned to the United States and developed Zika-like symptoms,” the CDC said in a statement. “The person later tested positive for Zika, along with their sexual partner, who had not traveled to the area.”

That said, reports of sexually transmitted Zika are rare, and experts say the most common form of transmission is via mosquito bites in South America, particularly Brazil, as well as in the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico, Cape Verde and certain Pacific islands (American Samoa, Samoa, Tonga).

Health officials warned pregnant women to avoid or postpone travel to those areas.

The L.A. County Department of Public Health says pregnant women who have traveled to those regions and who have “symptoms suggestive of Zika virus infection during or within two weeks of travel” should get tested.

“The most important messages concern people who may be traveling to locations in the world where Zika virus outbreaks are currently occurring, and advising them on measures they need to take to protect their own health and prevent bringing the disease back here to Los Angeles County,” the county’s interim health officer, Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, said yesterday.

The CDC says avoiding sexual contact with potential Zika patients probably is wise.

“Based on what we know now, the best way to avoid Zika virus infection is to prevent mosquito bites AND to avoid exposure to semen from someone who has been exposed to Zika virus or has been ill from Zika virus infection,” the CDC says.

There has been one case of Zika reported in L.A. And given our pathways to Latin America, it shouldn’t surprise anyone if there are more. That case, reported in November, involved a girl who had traveled to El Salvador late last year and later recovered.

It sounds like you shouldn’t be too afraid. But you should definitely be aware. For the latest info on the virus, go here.

J.N.K. Savage:Tracing The Works Of A Great Journalist Behind Computer Age

SAV 6Journalist/Documentary film Producer and Director Justin N.K. Savage and wife Nancy-Elizabeth Savage (Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson) You looking at my mother and father.

Justin Nobleman Kodwo Savage was a professional journalist, documentary film producer and director, born at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana in 1932. While in active service, he passed away on January 29, 1976.

At Guinea Press, now ‘The Ghanaian Times’ during the Kwame Nkrumah era, Mr. Savage travelled extensively across the globe, whenever the president leaves the country to participate in world affairs.

At home, Ghanaians were able to receive first-hand information from Mr. Savage, over Nkrumah’s trip overseas, appearing in ‘The Evening News,’ newspaper dominated by party news, CPP, and adulation of Nkrumah.

At Guinea Press, Justin Savage had the opportunity to make further studies in journalism in London, England, but Nkrumah’s interest in communism took him off Ghana soil to many Eastern European countries including Poland, Czechoslovakia etc, and Russia.

In the sixties, the president of the then Czechoslovakia invited African journalists to his country. Justin Savage heads the African journalists from Ghana, but the Ghanaians presence stole the show, because of the native Kente cloth they put on. Kente exposes the rich tradition and culture of Ghana.

Justin Savage filed his press cuts and combined all his publications which appeared in the newspapers as a magazine, naming it “A Mixture Of Periodicals.” These publications later after his death, became my favourite book, assisting me to gain more writing skills when my interest increased to be a writer.

Darkness fell on Ghana when Nkrumah was overthrown-ed on February 24, 1966, in a coup organized by CIA and local collaborators. Chaos and curfews followed amidst jubilation and sadness. Mr. Savage served Guinea press a year more and he resigned.

He followed a course in technology at the Kumasi Science and Technology, where he studied film production. After his course, he entered into Ghana Broadcasting Corporation as ‘Advisor on film for television.’

He excelled in his profession and had promotions. It wasn’t long when Friedrich Ebert Foundation (West German Television Team) established a television project attached to the Broadcasting House in Ghana.

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung is a German political foundation named after Friedrich Ebert, Germany’s first democratically elected president. Headquartered in Bonn and Berlin, the foundation contributes to social democracy by means of:

Political education in order to reinforce its fundamental values, research and scientific analysis of central policy areas, various forms of public dialogue in order to pave the way for it, scholarship programs for students and Ph.D. candidates, development cooperation aimed at global justice and building bridges of international cooperation for worldwide democracy.

For efficient service and to be familiar with new developments in television production, Mr. Savage was at West German for an intensive course. He returned to the Broadcasting House and was appointed ‘Documentary Film Producer and Director.

At the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, he made a number of documentary films, especially during the exhibition of Ghana and other African products at both the first and second ‘Ghana International Trade Fair,’ in Accra.

Kodwo, the name his co-workers loved to call him, did a number of documentary films, including ‘Ghana At A Glance, Cocoa In Ghana, Backyard Industries and ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced in 1972. I had the opportunity to play a role in ‘Backyard Industries.’

I grew up to see some of his friends such as Mr. Kofi Badu, the Managing Director of Daily Graphic and Mr. Willie Donkor, the Editor of Weekly Spectator, still in the media. In the early nineties, January, I contacted one of my father’s friends called Mr. Ebo Biney, at the Broadcasting House, requesting if he could telecast one of my father’s film on January 29, for remembrance. It came as a shock to me when I learned that all my father’s films got burnt, following a fire which engulfed Ghana Broadcasting Corporation some time ago.

Since then I have been working very hard to see if I can find any of my father’s work online, despite far behind computer age or advanced modern technology. Like winning a lotto, I discovered two. The first is at the website of Len Pole, a Museum Consultant: “Advisor on a film for television, ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced by Kodwo Savage, Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.” – http://www.lenpole.com/I contacted the museum consultant after the discovery of my father’s work on his website. I was delighted when he told a few years ago ‘Furnace in a village’ was shown at Cannes Film Festival.

Then I had a new break through  when I discovered another work at: Selected Bibliography in Communication – jstor by Graham B. Kerr, under the topic- All African governments are committed to development and most wish to …Journalism Quarterly [forthcoming]. ….. SAVAGEJ.N.K. “Ghana Jugend begeistert.- . “Ghana inspires youth.”

The selected Bibliography in Communication is a book published by the Canadian Association of African Studies. Justin Savage writes:

“We must bridge the gap between leaders and masses, between government and people . . No government tells the people everything, but every government must reach the people so as to tell them what they should be told” – Julius Nyerere

Continue reading: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/483601.pdf?

The search for my father’s work isn’t yet over. As time goes on when I discover something new, I will keep on updating this article. I hope readers will enjoy reading it and if any reader has any suggestion to improve it, you are always welcome.

The incredible story of this great writer neglected when he was a child is now available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Writer-Died-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L54A7O

We Know Where We Come From, But Where Do We Go After Death?

Death 2Be happy you’ll die instead of being sad thinking of death.

Death is something many don’t like to talk about, because it’s an enemy that ruins home, takes away our joy and destroys a whole family, yet it’s inevitable. 

Many do ask if we die “where do we go?” It’s hard to give a straight-forward answer. Even though I have cheated death many times in my life, I haven’t experienced it before to know how it is when you’re dead.

I don’t think a dead man has any memory after death to record his experience. According to the Bible: “For the living know that they will die,  but the dead know nothing… their love, their hatred, and their envy have now perished” Ecclesiastes 9:5.

Many believe in reincarnation, others don’t, but the Bible promises that there is life after death—and that it lasts forever.

There is something we need to ask: Why many who have died can’t rest peacefully in their graves but often haunt people occupying the houses they were before they died? Does it mean that truly life goes on after death?

There are many verses in the Bible that speak about the resurrection. John 5: 28-29 reads, “Do not marvel at this; for an hour is coming, in which all who are in the tombs will hear His voice, and will come forth; those who did the good deeds to a resurrection of life, those who committed the evil deeds to a resurrection of judgment.”

Despite all the Biblical quotations, many may still have different opinions and beliefs about death. Death will always remain a mystery and the greatest fears of life connected to the unknown.

We fear death because we are imperfect or our sinful nature. According to Romans 6:23 “For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord,” yet death is something we should not fear.

Many seem happy when they think of death in their old age. They don’t have anything to worry about because of their good deeds, genuine love and help they offered to people on earth. We can follow them to sow good seeds on earth. That’s where the happiness comes from till death.