Ghana’s Paa Joe: The Extraordinary Coffin Maker

Paa Joe's coffins

Lion-shaped coffin at Paa Joe’s coffin shop in Teshie, outside Accra, Ghana.

Paa Joe (with family the name Joseph Ashong) is a Ghanaian figurative palanquin and fantasy coffin artist born 1947 in the region Akwapim belonging to the Ga-Adangbe people, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Paa Joe is considered one of the most important Ghanaian coffin artist of his generation.

He was involved since 1989 in major art exhibitions in Europe, Japan, and the USA. His fantasy coffins are in the collections of many art museums worldwide, including the British Museum in London.

If Ghana is one of the leading countries in the world for Cocoa production, then Paa Joe can make cocoa pod coffin.

At 15, Paa Joe started  his ten-year apprenticeship as a coffin artist in the workshop of one called Kane Kwei (1924–1992) in Teshie. Then in 1976, he started his own business at Nungua.

Paa Joe’s experience and mastery over his works attracted a number of people to be trained as fantasy coffin artists. In 2007, he moved his workshop from Nungua to Pobiman, in the  Greater Accra region, where he still works with his two sons Jacob and Isaac. His work is now internationally known, enabling him to visit Britain in 2013.

The sculptor and artist: Joseph Ashong (Paa Joe)

 

Paa Joe’s sculpted coffins blur the line between art and craft. Each work is carefully constructed to reflect the ambition or the trade of the person for whom it was made. They are not dead things but are instead a manifestation of and indeed an affirmation of life. The works are wholly African and are a contemporary embodiment of traditional tribal burial rituals and art practice. They link back to pre-colonial West African sculpture but also recall the pomp and extravagance of ancient Egyptian royal tombs. In contemporary Western art

The works are wholly African and are a contemporary embodiment of traditional tribal burial rituals and art practice. They link back to pre-colonial West African sculpture but also recall the pomp and extravagance of ancient Egyptian royal tombs. In contemporary Western art practice, the coffins recall Jeff Koons.

They too are kitsch – Paa Joe, like Koons, plays with scale and with a work like the Jet, with material and commercial ostentation. The foremost sculpted coffin maker of his generation, Paa Joe apprenticed with Kane Kwei – who is credited with beginning the 20th-century tradition of figurative coffins. Paa Joe’s work is held in museum collections around the world including the British Museum in London.

Amazing Ghanaian Paintings By Amakai

Amakai paintings

Amakai presents his fun African art paintings

Africa is a large continent influenced by different cultures, customs, traditions and ideas, which are often presented or crafted as images. The creative artists in the continent produce wonderful and amazing paintings adored by tourists worldwide.

Ghana has many great artists who have made names for themselves, one of them is Amakai.

He attended Ghanatta College of Art and Design from 1998 – 2002. He was awarded the overall best student in his graduating class.

Beautiful paintings in Ghana

Amakai’s work is beautiful and hilarious

He started teaching in the school shortly after completing and has since been an art tutor at the college for quite some time now. Besides art, Amakai is also a musician.

The website of the artist: http://www.trueafricanart.com/index.html

 

 

UNDER THE DOWNPOUR: Oil Painting On Canvas By Leonid Afremov

DownpourColorful portrait painting – modern way to decorate your room

When we hear the word portrait, we imagine magnificent pictures of historical figures painted centuries ago. Keeping the noble face of a glorified political leader or great musician alive for future generations used to be the main goal of this genre – but not anymore. In our times, artists like Leonid Afremov try to find inspiration in everyday life.

An unintentionally observed scene, two strange girls in the street, a common situation repeating itself over and over again as long as the world exists – but the artist’s vivid imagination is capable of depicting it in fantastically bright colors and making it meaningful and dear to our hearts. Light up your room with this cheerful portrait painting sparkling with all shades of the spectrum!

Friendship under umbrella

It’s no secret that Leonid Afremov is fascinated by the rain. But we can rarely see it so bright and vigorous on his paintings! The rain is falling down in colorful streams painted with quick large strokes densely covering the entire canvas. Surrounded by these rainbow-colored cascades of water, the two heroines of the picture are walking barefoot under the same umbrella admiring the beauty of smeared reflections on the wet asphalt. Who are they? Old friends coming back from school?

Two sisters taking a walk together? Or maybe they just met a few minutes ago because one of them was too absent-minded to take her umbrella and the other was too kind-hearted not to offer hers? We don’t know, but they both seem to be rather delighted by this pastime. The girl on the left is painted in warm yellow shades, while the girl on the right with cold blue ones. If you look at the sidewalk on both sides, you’ll see that their silhouettes divide the canvas in two color zones.

The faces of the girls are blurred and we can’t see their expressions, but we can easily guess their mood in every centimeter of the painting. Bright, emotional and full of life, this portrait will light up the walls of your room and give it a new colorful look!

Who might be interested in buying it?

http://afremov.com/UNDER-THE-DOWNPOUR-PALETTE-KNIFE-Oil-Painting-On-Canvas-By-Leonid-Afremov-Size-24-x30.html