An Open Letter To Bill Gates, Alias Mr. Depopulator

DED 2Depopulation:”At least 350,000 must be killed each day”- Bill Gates.

By Joel Savage and Johan Van Dongen

During a recent interview of Bill Gates by CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Mr. Gates openly admitted that vaccinations are designed so that governments can depopulate the world. 

According to him in order to successfully depopulate an “overcrowded world” at least 350,000 must be killed each day, and he says this can be done via vaccine programs.

This statement may shock a lot of people, especially the common man, but not high learned people and scientists, including Holland’s Professor Johan Van Dongen.

Apart from the Micro-surgeon and scientist’s research that revealed that Aids, Ebola, Lassa fever and other deadly diseases, were laboratory engineered and used on mankind as bio-weapons, he has volumes of documents covering  Bill Gates’  medical crime of depopulation programs.

Professor Dongen’s documents didn’t only exposed Bill Gates’ medical crime activities, but also World Health Organization, The Rockefeller Foundation and the Center for Diseases Control.  All of them actively engaged to commit the most heinous crime in medical history. The effect drastically affected Africa.

Mr. Gates, many times, if Prof. Dongen wants his voice heard over those depopulation programs, many people think he was misleading or out of his mind, but your interview with Dr. Gupta would let the world know that Dongen’s research and claim that Aids and Ebola were medical crimes against Africa, are facts not an exaggeration.

Mr. Gates, you will agree that you’ve been in this medical crime business for a very long time. You will also agree with me that you have escaped exposure and punishment, because the World Health Organization, CDC, FBI and the CIA are protecting you.

Your protection is very necessary, because when your million dollar industry collapses, it’s going to be suicidal, since the whole world, including the economy of America will experience a chronic economic depression and also the profit making pharmaceutical companies will be affected too.

The more disturbing fact is your continuous protection by the law, enjoying impunity, while Dr. Jeff Bradstreet was murdered for just opposing vaccine, he believes was dangerous for autism. Again you are being protected by World Health Organization and Center for Diseases Control, while you make your money from other people’s mystery.

Mr. Gates, if you will permit me, we want to know why you prey on the poor? Your depopulation program targets, Africa, Asia and Latin-America. If you are doing a good job and being honest, then depopulation should have been a general issue, including Europe and America.

Mr. Gates, would you call yourself a successful businessman? If you are, then I’m sorry to tell you that you make your money out of other people’s misery. You created your wealth out of the suffering and killing of innocent children and women.

It’s a big shame to your entire family. Just as we wrote some weeks ago, asking the Rockefeller family to change their names, due to their criminal history, you should also do the same, because you and your family have indelible blood stain in your hands.

SO LONG A LETTER

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Written by award-winning African novelist Mariama Ba and translated from the original French, So Long a Letter has been recognized as one of Africa’s 100 Best Books of the 20th Century. The brief narrative, written as an extended letter, is a sequence of reminiscences—some wistful, some bitter—recounted by recently widowed Senegalese schoolteacher Ramatoulaye Fall. Addressed to a lifelong friend, Aissatou, it is a record of Ramatoulaye’s emotional struggle for survival after her husband betrayed their marriage by taking a second wife.

This semi-autobiographical account is a perceptive testimony to the plight of educated and articulate Muslim women. Angered by the traditions that allow polygyny, they inhabit a social milieu dominated by attitudes and values that deny them status equal to men. Ramatoulaye hopes for a world where the best of old customs and new freedom can be combined.

Considered a classic of contemporary African women’s literature, So Long a Letter is a must-read for anyone interested in African literature and the passage from colonialism to modernism in a Muslim country.

Winner of the prestigious Noma Award for Publishing in Africa.

The Author

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Mariama Bâ (April 17, 1929–August 17, 1981) was a Senegalese author and feminist, who wrote in French. Born in Dakar, she was raised a Muslim, but at an early age came to criticise what she perceived as inequalities between the sexes resulting from African traditions. Raised by her traditional grandparents, she had to struggle even to gain an education, because they did not believe that girls should be taught. Bâ later married a Senegalese member of Parliament, Obèye Diop, but divorced him and was left to care for their nine children.

Her frustration with the fate of African women—as well as her ultimate acceptance of it—is expressed in her first novel, So Long a Letter. In it she depicts the sorrow and resignation of a woman who must share the mourning for her late husband with his second, younger wife. Abiola Irele called it “the most deeply felt presentation of the female condition in African fiction.” This short book was awarded the first Noma Prize for Publishing in Africa in 1980.

Bâ died a year later after a protracted illness, before her second novel, Scarlet Song, which describes the hardships a woman faces when her husband abandons her for a younger woman he knew at youth, was published.

The historian Nzegwu has contended that Bâ’s life was rich in events. Bâ was born in Dakar, Senegal, in 1929, into an educated and well-to-do Senegalese family where she grew up. Her father was a career civil servant who became one of the first ministers of state. He was the Minister of Health in 1956 while her grand father was an interpreter in the French occupation regime.

After her mother’s death, Bâ was largely raised in the traditional manner by her maternal grandparents. She received her early education in French, while at the same time attending Koranic school.

Bâ was a prominent law student at school. During the colonial revolution period and later, girls faced numerous obstacles when they wanted to have a higher education. Bâ’s grandparents did not plan to educate her beyond primary school. However, her father’s insistence on giving her an opportunity to continue her studies eventually persuaded them.

In a teacher training college based in Rufisque (a suburb in Dakar), she won the first prize in the entrance examination and entered the École Normale. In this institution, she was prepared for later career as a school teacher. The school’s principal began to prepare her for the 1943 entrance examination to a teaching career after he noticed Bâ’s intellect and capacity. She taught from 1947 to 1959, before transferring to the Regional Inspectorate of teaching as an educational inspector.

Bâ was a novelist, teacher and feminist, active from 1979 to 1981 in Senegal, West Africa. Bâ’s source of determination and commitment to the feminist cause stemmed from her background, her parents’ life and her schooling. Indeed, her contribution is of absolute importance in modern African studies since she was among the first to illustrate the disadvantaged position of women in African society. Bâ’s work focused on the grandmother, the mother, the sister, the daughter, the cousin and the friend, how they all deserve the title “mother of Africa”, and how important they are for the society.

Mariama Bâ felt the failure of African liberation struggles and movements. Her earliest works were essays she wrote while at the École Normale. Some of her works have now been published. Her first work constitutes essentially a useful method of rejection of the “so-called French assimilationist policy”.

Bâ advocated urgent consideration and reinvigoration of African life.

This consideration and reinvigoration is essentially founded on the social construct of the relationship between man and woman. Indeed, there is an unequal and unbalanced power in the male/female relationship. According to her, these facts can help us become aware of Africa’s needs for societal change, a change more political than merely making speeches.

As a divorcee and “a modern Muslim woman” as she characterized herself, Bâ was active in women’s associations. She also ardently promoted education. She defended women’s rights, delivered speeches, and wrote articles in local newspapers. Thus, her contribution is significant because she explained and described the disadvantaged position of women in general and especially married women.

Bâ also had vision and determined commitment. She felt African people should reduce the deleterious impact of their culture. Women are plunged both psychologically and financially in a sensual indulgence and complete lack of regard for the consequences of men’s actions on families. They are completely blind. These facts led Bâ to believe in her mission to expose and critique the rationalisations employed to justify established power structures.

She thought that distortions of cultural thought and institutions are made to demonstrate masquerades as “tradition” and “culture”. Men and Women have been seduced into accepting the continuation of these “customs”. People should be “persuaded of the inevitable and necessary complementarity of man and woman”.

Bâ wrote many books openly sharing her thoughts and feelings, including: So Long a Letter (1981), Scarlet Songs (1986), and La fonction politique des littératures Africaines écrites (The Political Function of African Written Literatures) (1981).

http://www.amazon.com/Mariama-Ba/e/B000AP5I02

POSITIVELY FALSE: Exposing The Myths Around HIV And AIDS

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A Book by Joan Shenton

In the 30 years since ‘HIV’ was announced as the “probable cause” of AIDS we are no closer to a vaccine or cure. Scientists and clinicians who question the widely held belief that ‘HIV’ is the cause of AIDS hold fast to their position that multiple factors can be attributed to the illnesses defined as AIDS which continue to afflict specific communities and risk groups, and that billions of dollars and millions of lives have been wasted over a retrovirus that is either harmless or may not even exist.

This 16th Anniversary Edition of Positively False: Exposing the Myths around HIV and AIDS from award-winning tele-journalist Joan Shenton features the original late 1998 text with updates and contributions from 20 journalists, writers, scientists and clinicians who present critical arguments challenging the current scientific orthodoxy. They include: Henry H. Bauer, Christian Fiala, Neville Hodgkinson, David Crowe, Celia Farber, John Lauritsen and David Rasnick.

Also features the script of the 2014 documentary Positive Hell and renowned molecular biologist and pioneering critic Peter Duesberg et al.’s withdrawn 2009 paper for Medical Hypotheses.

“A gripping, timely, story of investigative journalism with analysis of the flaws in HIV/AIDS theory: that would still be an accurate description of this book, some fifteen years after it was first published.”

Henry H. Bauer, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Science Studies, and Emeritus Dean of Arts and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech).

The Author

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Joan Shenton is an independent tele-journalist whose documentaries include Positively False – Birth of a heresy (which was based on the original edition book of Positively False: Exposing the Myths around HIV and AIDS) and Positive Hell.

She has also produced documentaries on a variety of health issues for mainstream British television, earning Royal Television Society Journalism and British Medical Association awards.

She currently runs the Immunity Resource Foundation (IRF) which catalogues and disseminates alternative ideas on AIDS.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00QE80HNW

http://www.positivelyfalsebook.com/#lightbox/1/

“Life Is Very Hard. The Only People Who Really Live Are Those Who Are Harder Than Life Itself.”

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There are hundreds of definitions about ‘Life,’ but none gives me its true meaning, than this quote by author Nawal El Salaawi, “Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”  But who is this woman?

Nawal El Saadiaw has been pilloried, censored, imprisoned and exiled for her refusal to accept the oppression imposed on women by gender and class.

In her life and in her writings, this struggle against sexual discrimination has always been linked to a struggle against all forms of oppression: religious, racial, colonial and neo-colonial.

In 1969, she published her first work of non-fiction, Women and Sex ; in 1972, her writings and her struggles led to her dismissal from her job.

From then on there was no respite; imprisonment under Sadat in 1981 was the culmination of the long war she had fought for Egyptian women’s social and intellectual freedom. A Daughter of Isis is the autobiography of this extraordinary woman.

Author Nawal El Salaawi

Zero 5Nawal El Saadawi, also spelled Nawāl al-Saʿdāwī   (born Oct. 27, 1931, Kafr Ṭaḥlah, Egypt), Egyptian public health physician, psychiatrist, author, and advocate of women’s rights. Sometimes described as “the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab world,” El Saadawi was a feminist whose writings and professional career were dedicated to political and sexual rights for women.El Saadawi was educated at Cairo University (M.D., 1955), Columbia University in New York (M.P.H., 1966), and ʿAyn Shams University in Cairo (where she performed psychiatric research in 1972–74). In 1955–65 she worked as a physician at Cairo University and in the Egyptian ministry of health, and in 1966 she became the director-general of the health education department within the ministry.

In 1968 she founded Health magazine, which was shut down by Egyptian authorities several years later, and in 1972 she was expelled from her professional position in the ministry of health because of her book Al-marʾah wa al-jins (1969; Women and Sex), which was condemned by religious and political authorities.

El Saadawi was jailed in September 1981, and during the two months of her imprisonment she wrote Mudhakkirāt fī sijn al-nisāʾ (1984; Memoirs from the Women’s Prison) on a roll of toilet paper using a smuggled cosmetic pencil.

In 1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and religious opponents, including accusations of apostasy.

In 2002 a legal attempt was made by an Islamist lawyer to forcibly divorce her from her husband, and in May 2008 she won a case that had been brought against her by al-Azhar University, the major centre of Islamic learning, that included charges of apostasy and heresy.

El Saadawi’s novels, short stories, and nonfiction deal chiefly with the status of Arab women, as inMudhakkirāt tabībah (1960; Memoirs of a Woman Doctor), Al-khayt wa al-jidār (1972; The Thread and the Wall), Al-wajh al-ʿarī lī al-marʾah al-arabiyyah (1977; The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World), Al-ḥubb fī zaman al-nafṭ (1993; Love in the Kingdom of Oil), and Al-riwāyah (2004; The Novel).

The oppression of women by men through religion is the underlying theme of El Saadawi’s novel set in a mental institution, Jannāt wa Iblīs (1992; Jannāt and Iblīs). The female protagonists are Jannāt, whose name is the plural of the Arabic word for paradise, and Iblīs, whose name refers to the devil.

http://goo.gl/HrS2nD

Bill Gates’ Polio Vaccine Program Caused 47,500 Cases of Paralysis Death

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Polio cure or something more sinister? Why Bill and Melinda Gates prey on Third World Countries? Bill Gates and 47,500 Cases of Paralysis

In India, Monsanto hired Bollywood actors to promote genetically engineered cotton seed to illiterate farmers. Nana Petakar became a brand ambassador for Monsanto. The advertising has been called “aggressive, unscrupulous and false.

Bill Gates, heavily invested in Monsanto’s GMOs as well as in vaccines, hired the most beloved of Indian actors, Amitabh Bachchan, to promote the oral polio vaccine.

Here is one example of the ads Bachchan created. Here is Bachchan and use of Bollywood itself to promote the vaccines, and here is another ad, in which Bachchan employs his acting skills.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation says:

“Worldwide efforts in the last two decades have reduced the number of polio cases by 99 percent. Until we reach eradication, however, we are working with governments and all partners in the polio effort to ensure no child is at risk of either contracting or transmitting this crippling disease.”

Monsanto used Bollywood actors and succeeded in selling India’s farmers Bt cotton seeds. Profits for Monsanto rose. When yields were less than promised, farmers incurred massive debt, leading many to suicide, in what is considered “the worst-ever recorded wave of suicides of this kind in human history.” To date, the number of suicides has surpassed 250,000.

P. Sainath details this neoliberal terrorism:

“With giant seed companies displacing cheap hybrids and far cheaper and hardier traditional varieties with their own products, a cotton farmer in Monsanto’s net would be paying far more for seed than he or she ever dreamed they would. Local varieties and hybrids were squeezed out with enthusiastic state support. In 1991, you could buy a kilogram of local seed for as little as Rs.7 or Rs.9 in today’s worst affected region of Vidarbha. By 2003, you would pay Rs.350 — ($7) — for a bag with 450 grams of hybrid seed. By 2004, Monsanto’s partners in India were marketing a bag of 450 grams of Bt cotton seed for between Rs.1,650 and Rs.1,800 ($33 to $36).”

Long after it was apparent that Monsanto was having a lethal impact on India, Bill Gates who says he wants to help the poor in India, made a huge investment in Monsanto. Does Gates care that he invested in a company that has left poor children of India without their fathers and lost them their land they had lived on?

How is Gates’ other investment – vaccines – faring?  Mimicking Monsanto’s PR, Gates used Bollywood actors to strongly promote his vaccine campaign to ‘eradicate polio’ across India. Vaccines were given to Indian children. Have they brought health?

From “Polio program: let us declare victory and move on” by Neetu Vashisht and Jacob Puliyel at Medical Ethics http://www.issuesinmedicalethics.org/202co114.html:

“In 2011 there were an extra 47500 new cases of NPAFP [non-polio acute flaccid paralysis]. Clinically indistinguishable from polio paralysis but twice as deadly, the incidence of NPAFP was directly proportional to doses of oral polio received. Through this data was collected within the polio surveillance system, it was not investigated.”

The Oral Polio Vaccines were given to Indian children. The CDC dropped the OPV from its vaccine schedule in the US because it was causing polio.

Freetown 3Victims of polio crippling disease in Sierra Leone

Continue reading full article: http://nsnbc.me/2013/05/08/bill-gates-polio-vaccine-program-caused-47500-cases-of-paralysis-death/

Jesus Christ: The Carpenter’s Son Who Became A Superstar

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Jesus is one of the world’s outstanding religious leaders, a teacher, philosopher and a prophet, even though the Bible doesn’t mention his name as one of the prophets.

He was an ordinary young Jew born into a family of Carpenters and he passed through a painful death of crucifixion. The fact about this great teacher is: He never commanded an army, but today many people from all walks of life and army generals bow to revere him.

He wasn’t an author, but books about him are widely read and handled by the best literature professors. He never ruled a nation but today, some world presidents, politicians, and monarchs of high esteem adore him.

He never had any university education, but twenty centuries later, his works are being preached, archived and thought by best professors in science, arts, and religion.

The great teacher said: “I am the light of the world.” John 8:12. Yes! He is the light of science, politics, literature, humanity, and civilization. The greatest liberty ever given to man by God is ‘choice.’

Would you therefore emulate and imitate this great teacher, to be happy, faithful, sincere and healthy in life or you simply like to walk in the opposite way? In God’s kingdom, there is nothing called ‘Failure or Impossible.’

The two words of stumble block, are the tools of unbelievers, the reason many fail in life, while others succeed in life. Take away those shackles of your mind and let your faith and the truth set you free to prosperity and success.

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. 

Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

The Author

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Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; Discover; and others. She has worked as a correspondent for NPR’s Radiolab and PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW, and is a contributing editor at Popular Science magazine and guest editor of The Best American Science Writing 2011.
               She is a former Vice President of the National Book Critics Circle and has taught creative nonfiction and science journalism at the University of Memphis, the University of Pittsburgh, and New York University. Her debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, took more than ten years to research and write, and became an instant New York Times bestseller.
                She has been featured on numerous television shows, including CBS Sunday Morning and The Colbert Report. Her book has received widespread critical acclaim, with reviews appearing in The New Yorker, Washington Post, Science, Entertainment Weekly, People, and many others.
                It won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and was named The Best Book of 2010 by Amazon.com, and a Best Book of the Year by Entertainment Weekly; O, The Oprah Magazine; The New York Times; Washington Post; US News & World Report; and numerous others.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is being translated into more than twenty languages, and adapted into a young adult book, and an HBO film produced by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball. Skloot lives in Chicago but regularly abandons city life to write in the hills of West Virginia, where she tends to find stray animals and bring them home.

She travels extensively to speak about her book. For more information, visit RebeccaSkloot.com, where you will find book special features, including photos and videos, as well as her book tour schedule, and links to follow her and The Immortal Life on Twitter and Facebook.