#POEMS: OUT OF THE SILENT BREATH

OBY 8

Jacqueline Oby-Ikocha’s poems portray images that stare us right in the face. Images of love, joy, death, pain, challenges, violation, and freedom. She writes in a language that’s rich in imagery, earthy, honest, vulnerable, yet full of the promise of hope, of loving and of Grace. A collection of light and dark soulful prose. 

Somewhere, sometimes, life takes us through difficult, unexpected pathways that bring us to the edge of a precipice. These life-lessons that knock us down to our knees also become turning and redeeming points in our lives. They open our eyes to the important things and make us to question or find our purpose.

They drive us to wake up, to make the conscious choice to rise and step out and to live fully in the present moments that life brings us. It is the things that we deeply love that saves our sanity in these moments and gives us reason to hope, to open the doors and to fly.

Out of the silent breath is a vivid compilation of joyful, melancholic and hopeful prose through different walks of life.

The Author

OBY 6

Jacqueline Oby-Ikocha is a fellow blogger who is originally from Nigeria.  Her blog is A Cooking Pot and Twisted Tales.  She uses this platform to support fellow bloggers and to raise awareness of the many  ongoing cultural inequalities and problems in the world.  Here is Jacqueline’s story in her own words:

I like to describe myself as a Jacqueline of all trade and a mistress of nothing. Everything is work-in-progress in my life, including me. Nothing is finished for, there’s always room for more improvement.

If all is finished, then that means that I am done on this side of the great divide. I believe that I still have a pretty long way to go with hammering myself into a worthy state before toddling off to sing angelic lullabies.

I was born in Nigeria in the mid 70’s, to a family with one of the best parents that I could have ever asked for.

My growing up years was in University of Nigeria, Nsukka campus. A close-knit community where everyone knew what you had for breakfast, lunch and dinner and pretty much any shenanigans that you got up to. Back then, an honorary auntie could feel enough righteous indignation and would help to straighten you out before sending you home to your parents who will cement the straightening with their own dose of reprimanding.

As a young lady in High school, I was involved in a number of social and community activities. From Church work to participating in dramas at the local theatre, speaking at regular debate contests and contribution to the young writer’s club. At the initial stage, these artistic flairs propelled my interest to further my university education in Theatre or Communication Arts, however, due to the general inclination back then, that artists in Nigeria had no bright future, I leaned towards studying law.

My education in law was closely followed by several professional courses, in Public Relations, Chartered Secretary, and Administrators, an associate degree in the French Language as well as a Diploma in Translation. French is a language that I find not only romantic, but everything just sounds decadently delicious in French even when they are shouting.

Fast forward to my career path and like I had indicated right from the onset, I have done so many things.

I started my working life at The Embassy of Tunisia in Lagos as the Personal Assistant to the Ambassador and after a brief stint in France, I returned and joined the Embassy of France also in Lagos.

My position working with the Cultural Attaché to the Embassy of France paved an opportunity to join The Delegation of the European Union in Abuja, Nigeria. It was a job that offered a lot of training and travel opportunities and during this point in time, I met my dear husband, who whisked me off to the altar after a six-month whirlwind courtship. Our union will turn 16 years in November and we are blessed with three beautiful children.

The natural process of having babies with a stillbirth and several miscarriages in-between meant juggling family life along with my career, cycling through different jobs as I sought to find that which suited my family lifestyle a lot better.

I held job positions ranging from Archivist, Executive Assistant, Personal Assistant, Public Relations Officer, Administrative Manager, Records Manager to School Registrar.

http://www.amazon.com/Out-Silent-Breath-Jacqueline-Oby-Ikocha-ebook/dp/B01EYN38ES

 

Advertisements

PINKHONEYSUCKLE

Barb 2

As an author, the 60 year hidden story of the poor whites and blacks, along with one woman narrating the coming of age era of The Misinformation surrounding theDiaspora of southern people from the lower Appalachian farms to dismal city dwellings is shown, in truth, as how quaint towns, small farms, and independent people were turned into fully impoverished farm dwellers or large communities steered toward flood zones of Great Lakes Cities.

The author’s style of mixing humor into abysmal circumstances, or to take you into the cold fear of harm always lurking along the path from an agrarian child to city woman has led Amazon readers to 5 start declarations of the beauty, suspense, the unspeakable mixed with the salvaging of a soul and the deepest respect from roots of injustice and poverty. People speak of their inability to control tears from

People speak of their inability to control tears from the sorrows and then from the laughter as only a southern Sand Mountain born girl can tell of the darkness versing the light–The innocence always under attack from forces of evil, and how people place their hopes in the hereafter just to make personal degradation unhinge them from their and her families example of the multitudes who would make a decision to hang on or to head, “North.”

The historical age and the assassination of John Kennedy, The CivilRights Movement, and watching Washington burn after the death of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King chills one into the reality that we were a country on the edge of collapsing from within for while, “Grapes ofWrath,” showed the mass migration to California of the Oklahomans–

Never before has the lives and deaths of Southern Appalachians people and places have never been recorded as the disaster and diaspora heaped upon American citizens without apology or even to acknowledge that such a move south to north was engineered.–The death of small farms and sharecroppers,the mystical experiences which separated these farm dwellers to know the seasons, to interpret the wind, and to know of angel interventions and it is all the made up pretty word, “Pinkhoneysuckle.”

The book, the movie in development took first place in Hollywood 2012and Honorable Mention in San Francisco 2012 Book Festivals. It is now known on both sides of the Rockies and has book followers as distant as, P.R. of China, the city of Wuhan.  2014 PBS WGUC, Cincinnati, interviewed by Lee Hay, Cincinnati, A noted PBS star in Mid West selected to do a series based on the life of Kentucky neighbors, Rosemary Clooney and Family.  Interviewed by Donna Seebo, Seattle radio and NW in program on, “Pinkhoneysuckle,”–Donna Seebo’s programs go on to Armed Forces Radio and Supports Wounded Warriors, USA.

The Author

Barb 4

Revealing in truth and in fiction one woman’s experience of growing up in a 3rd world America hidden by the structure of its own roots as this country evolved from hidden people of the Appalachian mountains and valleys. The author will not allow you to know the places where fiction ends and basic facts of her life take over, for she says of it that pain is a treasure chest.

Open it, and look inside, but at the end of it; Long to find out more. How could one live the realities of the hidden white poor, especially when you were reminded every day of the horrid truth: Worse off than you were the black poor, and the bottom feeders in a river will fight for turf and for respect because a whole lot of people knew hunger, the absence of health care, and the adults wanted you, no; they warned you to keep your mouth shut or what hide you had, the skin the covered your bones would be beaten off, and until that happened.

You did not know, “Nothing.” Church called out that the prophets loved you, and there was going to be a day of reckoning, so like the apostles of old that it was all coming to an end left you petrified because one could never be good enough. Oh little girls and women; Just lean over, and if your skin shows; Then you have asked to be brutalized in the worst of ways. Girl, you’re not pretty, even though your skin is porcelain; you can see them in the classroom crossing their eyes and laughing that bunch of boys other school girls want something from.

You do not get it, for everything having to do with boyfriends until you find one like the television families growing up in Hollywood then is just a pack of danger. Everyone laughed at the idea that you wanted to fix your hair, but it grew like an Indian squaw and were it not for your old man putting the word he out that he would kill the son of a bitch that defiled you.

Then you would have been, “Mashed,” into the mud, for girls and women needed to be marked by the earth itself. You saw your friends get babies around school or disappear to girls homes, and words like incest, or laying down with a no good boy not desiring to marry left them worn out women, but, “No,” They were still girls like me. Daddy did a really good thing protecting us from the snakes he could see, but the hidden one was going to use you as a no account because he could get by with it. Daddy never suspected that family was not always virtuous. The trembling girl lived to tell the story. “God;” I lived.

http://www.amazon.com/Pinkhoneysuckle-Barbara-Everett-Heintz/dp/1461188202

New York Times Reporter Found Dead After Exposing MKUltra

Sarah Kershaw

Sarah Kershaw

Posted on February 24, 2016 by Sean Adl-Tabatabai in News, US

A former New York Times reporter has been found murdered in the Dominican Republic following her exposure of MKUltra. Sarah Kershaw was found asphyxiated due to strangulation on Monday at her apartment in Sosua.

Project MKUltra, often referred to as the CIA’s mind control program, was the code name given to an illegal program of experiments on human subjects, designed and undertaken by the the CIA. Ms Kershaw published an article with the New York Times exploring this subject in 2008 with her article Sharing their Demons on the Web, writing:

“For people who regularly visit and write on message boards on the mind-control sites, the idea that others would describe the sites as promoting delusional and psychotic thinking is simply evidence of a cover-up of the truth.”

In her article, Ms. Kershaw wrote that people who felt they were being targeted had found the support of Missouri Representative Jim Guest, who told the Times: “I’ve had enough calls, some from credible people — professors — being targeted by nonlethal weapons. They become psychologically affected by it. They have trouble sleeping at night.”

When Ms. Kershaw wrote her article, psychotronic warfare was not legal against US citizens, but that all changed with the National Defense Authorization Act 2013. In response to the legalization of psychotronic warfare, Abreu Report published an article, writing:

“Psychotronic weapons are those that act to take away a part of the information which is stored in a man’s brain. It is sent to a computer, which reworks it to the level needed for those who need to control the man, and the modified information is then reinserted into the brain. These weapons are used against the mind to induce hallucinations, sickness, mutations in human cells, ‘zombification,’ or even death. Included in the arsenal are VHF generators, X-rays, ultrasound, and radio waves.”

Is it possible that Ms. Kershaw stumbled upon some new information that made her dangerous? Considering the speed at which the capabilities of psychotronic weapons has improved, the possibility is extremely high.

Opinion and conclusion- Joel Savage

The fear of being killed by the CIA, FBI or America’s secret assassination squad, is exactly what is haunting many journalists, through out Europe and America, preventing them to reveal to the general public that Aids, Ebola, Lassa fever were biological weapons against humanity, and above all African-Americans and Africans were used for experimentation and drug tests. The question is: If everyone fears to speak the truth, then what kind of society are we creating for the next generation, including our children?

 

THE MALEVOLENT TWIN

SAGE 2

“The Malevolent Twin” is the story of a wayward wicked twin with destructive intentions. Avery Tran is ordinary in every way except one: her friend Venice. Since she was a young girl Avery was the only one who could see Venice. Avery would describe her as her own alter ego. As Avery got older, Venice began to appear in front of Avery wearing obscene clothing, mocking and harassing her for her frumpy style and average looks Eventually, Avery started to wonder what Venice truly was.

Usually imaginary friends leave after childhood is over. Her curiosity leads her to an abandoned ancient mobile home, where her parents had buried a stillborn, then to a wise old exorcist who failed to successfully exorcise Venice, then finally to a quirky middle aged psychic. All the trouble starts when Avery wakes up in a swinger’s club.

Having no recollection of how she ended up there, Avery starts to think it is Venice’s doing, after discovering herself dressed and made up to look like Venice. Soon after, a neighbor’s dog goes missing and a murder scene appears at her work place. Avery confronts Venice about these heinous acts and learns what she already suspected: it was Venice, controlling her body, who had committed the crimes.

Frantic to stop Venice, Avery starts to handcuff herself to the bed and searches for a way to rid herself of Venice entirely. The quirky psychic, Pennie Apples, helps her figure out what is really going on, but it comes too late. Venice murders someone very close to Avery, who feels obliged to turn herself in. In the end, Avery learns a lesson about what happens when the imaginary abruptly becomes very real.

The Author

SAGE 5

Mary Sage Nguyen is the youngest daughter of Vietnamese and Chinese immigrants. Vietnamese was the language spoken at home, so the only way she was able to learn English was through the public school system. Even though English was not spoken at home, Mary became an avid reader as a young child and always dreamed of being a writer someday.

Mary loves fantasy, young adult, and sci fi books and does read books outside my genres from time to time. Some of her favorite authors include Robert A. Heinlein, J.K Rowling, lemony Snicket, Eoin Colfer, Cecily von Ziegesar, Kevin Kwan, Jean Kwok, and C. S. Lewis. The last book I read was “Crazy Rich Asians” by Kevin Kwan. I am currently reading “The Casual Vacancy” by J.K Rowling.

“When I am not plotting and scheming about my future book project,  I do promote other authors, freelancing, and editing unpublished manuscripts. You can find me working as a social media manager at www.oltanow.com andwww.coleandassociateslawfirm.com.”

http://www.amazon.com/Mary-Sage-Nguyen/e/B00VU2RAY6

Black History: Once Upon A Time In America

Years after slavery, African-Americans are still struggling to be real Americans

Elizabeth Ann Eckford, a student, and a key figure at the Little Rock Central High School is pictured being followed, booed and yelled at by a mob of whites. She was among the group of the nine African-American students famous for having desegregated the school in 1957. A closer look at the lady on the right, you can see the chilling, unreasonable dislike in her eyes. This reflects on the history of Apartheid Education in America.

In the deep sea, the big fish has no sympathy for the helpless small fish. They intimidate the small ones and always try to eat them up. That was once the hostile situation in America years back, in every sector, including the educational sector, against African-Americans. 

It’s very embarrassing to see such images in America, a country that  believes in democracy, above all they say: In God We Trust.

The more disturbing factor is, America provided  a “safe haven” in the United States for Nazis criminals and their collaborators after World War II, yet subjected African-Americans to abuse, discrimination, lynching, experimentation, and slavery.

Abolition of slavery is a fact recorded in history, but the reality is, it still exists in many places around the globe, including America today because we live in a violent and corrupt society.

How many years now did America start fighting against an illegal drug entering its sovereignty? Because of corruption, the country is plagued by cocaine and other dangerous drugs, drastically taking its toll on many citizens.

There was a time, if you are an honest hard worker, with distinguished achievements in the society, you will be awarded, but now those who commit serious crimes against humanity are those that receive that awards, including the Nobel Prize. Among the ring of liars, if you want to remain different and live in truth, you will eventually become an enemy.

Do you feel this world is okay? Are you happy about the turmoil and the path of doom the world has taken? Why politicians fighting for power when they don’t have any means to save this world? Nothing in this world seems to be going better or doing well. Everything has taken the wrong path.

Whether Africans were used as Guinea pigs in testing drugs, whether Aids, Ebola, Lassa and other deadly diseases, were bio-weapons against Africans to depopulate the continent, or whether African-Americans were used for experimentation, the Black man has survived today. That power wasn’t strong enough to wipe out the black race.

Black history is a sad song and a rough road. Even though it’s like an image hanging on the wall, the Black man should change that sad song to a happy song and straighten up that rough road ahead of him. We should let go hatred, jealousy, racism, racial discrimination and hypocrisy to embrace love in our community.

“Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails.” —I Corinthians 13:4-8a.

“Life Is Very Hard. The Only People Who Really Live Are Those Who Are Harder Than Life Itself.”

Zero 4

There are hundreds of definitions about ‘Life,’ but none gives me its true meaning, than this quote by author Nawal El Salaawi, “Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”  But who is this woman?

Nawal El Saadiaw has been pilloried, censored, imprisoned and exiled for her refusal to accept the oppression imposed on women by gender and class.

In her life and in her writings, this struggle against sexual discrimination has always been linked to a struggle against all forms of oppression: religious, racial, colonial and neo-colonial.

In 1969, she published her first work of non-fiction, Women and Sex ; in 1972, her writings and her struggles led to her dismissal from her job.

From then on there was no respite; imprisonment under Sadat in 1981 was the culmination of the long war she had fought for Egyptian women’s social and intellectual freedom. A Daughter of Isis is the autobiography of this extraordinary woman.

Author Nawal El Salaawi

Zero 5Nawal El Saadawi, also spelled Nawāl al-Saʿdāwī   (born Oct. 27, 1931, Kafr Ṭaḥlah, Egypt), Egyptian public health physician, psychiatrist, author, and advocate of women’s rights. Sometimes described as “the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab world,” El Saadawi was a feminist whose writings and professional career were dedicated to political and sexual rights for women.El Saadawi was educated at Cairo University (M.D., 1955), Columbia University in New York (M.P.H., 1966), and ʿAyn Shams University in Cairo (where she performed psychiatric research in 1972–74). In 1955–65 she worked as a physician at Cairo University and in the Egyptian ministry of health, and in 1966 she became the director-general of the health education department within the ministry.

In 1968 she founded Health magazine, which was shut down by Egyptian authorities several years later, and in 1972 she was expelled from her professional position in the ministry of health because of her book Al-marʾah wa al-jins (1969; Women and Sex), which was condemned by religious and political authorities.

El Saadawi was jailed in September 1981, and during the two months of her imprisonment she wrote Mudhakkirāt fī sijn al-nisāʾ (1984; Memoirs from the Women’s Prison) on a roll of toilet paper using a smuggled cosmetic pencil.

In 1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and religious opponents, including accusations of apostasy.

In 2002 a legal attempt was made by an Islamist lawyer to forcibly divorce her from her husband, and in May 2008 she won a case that had been brought against her by al-Azhar University, the major centre of Islamic learning, that included charges of apostasy and heresy.

El Saadawi’s novels, short stories, and nonfiction deal chiefly with the status of Arab women, as inMudhakkirāt tabībah (1960; Memoirs of a Woman Doctor), Al-khayt wa al-jidār (1972; The Thread and the Wall), Al-wajh al-ʿarī lī al-marʾah al-arabiyyah (1977; The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World), Al-ḥubb fī zaman al-nafṭ (1993; Love in the Kingdom of Oil), and Al-riwāyah (2004; The Novel).

The oppression of women by men through religion is the underlying theme of El Saadawi’s novel set in a mental institution, Jannāt wa Iblīs (1992; Jannāt and Iblīs). The female protagonists are Jannāt, whose name is the plural of the Arabic word for paradise, and Iblīs, whose name refers to the devil.

http://goo.gl/HrS2nD

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks

Life 4

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. 

Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

The Author

BEC 2

Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; Discover; and others. She has worked as a correspondent for NPR’s Radiolab and PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW, and is a contributing editor at Popular Science magazine and guest editor of The Best American Science Writing 2011.
               She is a former Vice President of the National Book Critics Circle and has taught creative nonfiction and science journalism at the University of Memphis, the University of Pittsburgh, and New York University. Her debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, took more than ten years to research and write, and became an instant New York Times bestseller.
                She has been featured on numerous television shows, including CBS Sunday Morning and The Colbert Report. Her book has received widespread critical acclaim, with reviews appearing in The New Yorker, Washington Post, Science, Entertainment Weekly, People, and many others.
                It won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and was named The Best Book of 2010 by Amazon.com, and a Best Book of the Year by Entertainment Weekly; O, The Oprah Magazine; The New York Times; Washington Post; US News & World Report; and numerous others.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is being translated into more than twenty languages, and adapted into a young adult book, and an HBO film produced by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball. Skloot lives in Chicago but regularly abandons city life to write in the hills of West Virginia, where she tends to find stray animals and bring them home.

She travels extensively to speak about her book. For more information, visit RebeccaSkloot.com, where you will find book special features, including photos and videos, as well as her book tour schedule, and links to follow her and The Immortal Life on Twitter and Facebook.