In The Shoes Of Steve Biko: I Write What I Like

Steve Biko sacrificed his life to make what South Africa is today

Steve Biko was the father of the Black Consciousness Movement in South Africa. In 1977, while in custody, he was severely beaten to death.

During the Apartheid era, the Dutch government through legislation came up with laws that restricted the mixing of non-white South Africans and whites. World leaders, including Margaret Thatcher, the former British prime minister, and the foreign media kept sealed lips and watched the crimes, atrocities, discrimination, grim terror and repression against South Africans.

The saddest part of the story is the imprisonment of some of the ANC members, including Nelson Mandela for 27 years, at the notorious Robben Island prisons, for his efforts to end Apartheid in his country, and the brutal murder of Steve Biko, whose articles against Apartheid he named ‘I write what I like’ were considered a threat to national security.

Despite Mandela’s legacy in fighting apartheid and helping South Africa seek healing and forgiveness, nothing has changed significantly in South Africa and around the world in regards to racism and discrimination against blacks. During the Apartheid era the foreign media failed the entire Africa, including South Africans, history has repeated itself again as we see the incompetence of the foreign media again on African issues.

In journalism, the foreign media think there are certain facts about diseases, such as Aids, Ebola, Lassa fever etc, which needed to be hidden from the public, as a measure to protect the image of their country. America, Belgium, France, Holland etc, had a hand in the Aids and Ebola medical crimes against Africa, but they continue to enjoy impunity and the support of the foreign media.

Just imagine, Belgium is now at war against terrorism, fighting hard against crime, yet the media has failed to address Belgium as a country supporting crime. If there is no statue of Hitler for killing six million Jews, why should they erect a statue of a king that maimed and killed over 10 million Africans, including women and children? Are they not supporting crime? Journalism without integrity and honesty is similar to a country ruled by a corrupt politician. 

As an African writer, I take a serious look at the setbacks and flaws of the foreign journalism. When it comes to issues pertaining Africa, there is always partiality in the foreign journalism.They find it very hard to write the truth and it will always remain the same as long as they can’t write the truth of the origins of Aids and Ebola.

There are codes of ethics governing journalism but it’s completely abused. One can hold a degree or diploma in journalism, but once you are not obeying the rules of journalism, means you are not a qualified journalist. I like what I write even if it generates hate. That will not change my style of writing because I’m proud to be a true born African and I will continue to defend my continent against lies and injustice.

Life in Apartheid-Era South Africa

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