A Special Interview With The Idi Amin Of Belgium, King Leopold II

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Journalist and author Joel Savage, interviews the White Idi Amin of Belgium, King Leopold II

I believe everyone knows or heard of King Leopold II. He was one of Belgium’s greediest and bloodthirstiest kings, who killed and maimed over ten million Africans, including children, during the colonial era in Congo. Despite that there isn’t any statue of Adolf Hitler for killing six million Jews, Belgium built a statue and named streets after this lunatic. So I took a trip to the Neo-Gothic Church of our Lady in Laeken, Brussels, where all the monarchs, including Leopold II, are buried, for this exclusive interview.

Joel: King Leopold, how do you feel about this interview?

Leopold: I need peace in my grave. How can you interview a dead man?

Joel: If the Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (The Mormons) could baptize the dead, then I could possibly interview a dead man.

Leopold: Please allow me to sleep peacefully in my grave. Why are you disturbing me?

Joel: You know what you did. You rendered thousands of villagers homeless, by putting fire into their huts, amputated the hands and limbs of children, mutilated the genitals of fathers and killed wives of husbands, for the greed of rubber and the desire to be the world’s richest king, yet your country praised and applauded your crimes and named streets after you. That’s not the end; you have a statue in addition. Are you happy in your grave for such horrendous crimes you committed?

Leopold: Even if I am not happy at all in my grave, I wasn’t the one responsible for my statue, because I didn’t ask anyone to build my statue and named streets after me.

Joel: Who are you trying to shift the blame to? For remembrance and honor, wreaths are laid at cemeteries for people, including soldiers that sacrificed their lives for your country, but the innocent blood of Africans you shed and the children you murdered are being mocked with your statue. Black Lives Matter, do you think Belgium can mock the dead and be a happy country?

Leopold: I want to repeat it once again if you didn’t hear me. I didn’t tell my country to build statue and name streets after me. They did it out of ignorance and foolish pride. They should be intelligent enough to know that I don’t deserve such statue.

Joel: Many believe you are not human, because during that time span, greed and power propelled you to commit the most serious crimes you deserve to go down the gallows, but nobody gave a damn for what you were doing because everybody else did almost the same. African soil was cut into pieces and confiscated by the foreigners. The way of thinking at that time was black people can be used for everything as a resource and as a disposable and Africa is ours. So who is the ignorant or the one who lacks wisdom, when you wore a sheep’s clothing deceiving the world as a good king, yet on a killing spree?

Leopold: Don’t let me start scratching my head when there isn’t any itching. I have had enough in my grave, tell my people to break down my statue and denounce the name of the streets named after me, because I can feel that my country is doomed because of this evil thing they did.

Joel: Your country is stubborn like a He-goat. They are confused because it’s one of the divided and difficult countries to rule in the world. Their confusion is very deep that they can’t even differentiate good from evil.  They have thousands of journalists but none has written about this because they are not Africans. They don’t care.

Leopold: You have said the right thing, but be careful, else you will be an enemy. I know my people; they are pretenders and bad just like me.

Joel: I want to be an enemy Leopold because that makes me an important person. When you are not important no one hates you in the society.

Joel: I have two questions from my mentor, Professor Johan Dongen for you. The first question is: You killed over ten million Africans, including children. Do you think there will be enough Africans left to kill by your grandchildren?

Leopold: Don’t bring my family into this. I did all those evil things alone.

Joel: I need to bring your family into this, because wickedness and evil acts can be inherited by family, including grandchildren.

Joel: Professor Dongen’s second question is: You always carry a sword on your statues and portraits. He may like see it. Will you give it to him if it’s in your grave?

Leopold: That sword is cursed, because of the evil things I did with it. If I give it to anyone, it will bring more disaster upon Belgium.

Leopold: Before I leave, please ask God to forgive me and let the same God touch the heart of my people that I don’t deserve those statues and streets named after me. If they are wise enough, then they should break down the statue or keep it, because the chicken always comes back home to roost.

Joel: Are you sure you know God King Leopold and you did this? Anyway, thank you for granting me this interview.

Leopold: You are welcome.

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